CTX predicts a future of flat-panels

The ever-growing scrapheap of redundant technology may soon be welcoming a new guest, the CRT (cathode-ray tube) monitor, according to electronics manufacturer CTX International.

The company predicts CRTs will be a rarity by 2005, with PC buyers opting for more space-saving LCDs (liquid crystal displays).

In 2001, LCD monitors accounted for just six percent of the monitor maker's revenue. But in the last two years, figures have dramatically increased and LCD panels now make up 42 percent of its sales.

The existing market for CRTs, according to the company's president of displays Peter Hollman, is from Eastern and Central Europe, where cheaper prices remain the most crucial factor behind the choice of equipment. "However, with prices for LCDs continuing to drop and many Eastern European countries soon joining the EU, it won't be long before these markets will follow the trend in Western Europe," said Hollman.

CTX's findings are backed up by a separate survey, conducted by analysts at research firm Bryan Norris Associates, which revealed a whopping 3.5 million of the six million monitors sold in Western Europe throughout the second quarter of this year were LCDs. That's a growth rate of 300 percent from the same period last year.

"The LCD monitor will drive the CRT monitor out of the market," said Hollman. "The major obvious advantage of an LCD monitor is that it's lightweight and takes up less desk space than a CRT. Additionally it produces high-quality pictures, the screen does not flicker and it saves energy by using much less power and generating less heat."

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Wendy Brewer

PC Advisor

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