HP's Fiorina touts Nokia deal, Net services

These services will allow users to access information such as news and sports results, as well as corporate data and e-mail, from a multitude of devices including smart phones and PCs, she said.

At the same time, Fiorina downplayed HP's disastrous financial results reported earlier Monday, in which the company said it had widely missed earnings expectations for its fourth fiscal quarter. Earnings per share for the period amounted to 41 US cents before unusual items, compared with the 52 US cents expected by financial analysts.

"Don't we get a recount, too?" Fiorina quipped, referring to the ongoing dispute over who earned the most votes in the US presidential election.

In a wide-ranging speech at Comdex that also touched on the digital divide and the growth of mobile computing, Fiorina said the Internet is entering a new phase in which Internet-based services will become more important to users than the products and technologies that deliver them.

In one example, she highlighted a deal announced Monday with Nokia, in which the Finnish phone giant will bundle HP software with some of its products, allowing users to communicate with hardware devices such as printers from their mobile phones.

"We're enabling Nokia phones to connect to printers and print anything that lives on the Web -- everything from basketball game scores to e-mail messages," Fiorina said.

She highlighted HP technologies such as eSpeak, a software platform developed by HP and designed to enable devices to "talk" to each other intelligently. Using eSpeak, printers in the future will be able to know intelligently when they are running out of ink, and order replacement ink cartridges automatically over the Web, she said.

Her hour-long speech barely made reference to HP's giant PC and server businesses, concentrating instead on the company's software technologies. Fiorina also highlighted HP's recent purchase of Bluestone Software, which brought the company an applications server rich in Java- and XML technologies.

"By adding Bluestone's XML-based Web application server and tools, we're creating the richest development environment for the services-based model that I'm talking about," she said.

The eSpeak strategy, which has been outlined in previous speeches, appears to put HP in direct competition with Microsoft, which through its .Net vision also aims to provide a software platform for building these Web-based services. In a veiled jab at Microsoft, Fiorina said the future of the Net must be driven by open standards, allowing software and hardware from multiple vendors to interoperate.

"We see an Internet that is no longer bound by proprietary technologies, closed computing architectures, the classic PC or even by electricity," she said. "We are seeing an Internet defined more by the companies and people that use it than the technologies that make it work."

Success in the future means learning to capitalise on the convergence of three emerging trends, she said: the growth of Internet appliances; electronic services delivered over the Web; and the fact that high-speed, always-on Internet connections will become a ubiquitous part of daily life.

Fiorina also highlighted the company's efforts to enfranchise "the four billion people in this world who do not have access to technology." HP has established a technology centre in Costa Rica, for example, where local workers have access to PCs powered by solar technology, where they can use the Web to access healthcare and other valuable information, she said.

The philanthropic effort isn't purely a way of providing "digital handouts," but aims in part to open new business opportunities for HP in the future, she said.

"It's not enough for scientists to be focused on the future of computing 5 to 10 years out. We also need to be focused on opening new markets, new business opportunities five to 10 years out," she said.

Join the PC World newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Struggling for Christmas presents this year? Check out our Christmas Gift Guide for some top tech suggestions and more.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

James Niccolai

PC World

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Shopping.com

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?