Stories by Tom Yager

Leopard leaps in

Apple is promising a fast turnaround for the next major release of OS X. Version 10.5, dubbed Leopard, should hit the streets in spring 2007. Beyond such front-end improvements as improved search, chat, and application linking, a number of under-the-...

An Apple for the enterprise?

Like it or not, buyers of x86 servers, clients, and workstations face a major platform shift as the 32-bit CPUs, operating systems, and applications slowly fade into history. That historic migration will have dramatic impact. After all, 64-bit comput...

Sun ahead in server market

Inexplicably, we've gotten through much of 2006 without Linux completely kicking Unix out of the market. Analysts and Linux faithful are at a loss to explain how Sun Microsystems' server revenue climbed almost 14 percent since the second quarter last...

Apple hits the right note

My city's symphony orchestra is marvelous. In a lesser setting, any of the orchestra's musicians would be a marquee soloist, front and center. But as an orchestra, about 100 consummately talented artists become one. The visual spectacle and the socio...

Linux will get buried

I've kept a practically subterranean profile since Apple's Worldwide Developer Conference a few weeks ago. I have so many venues at which to serve the many pots of content I've got bubbling upstairs that spreading it evenly and avoiding redundancy is...

AMD's best is yet to come

A reader recently shot me a note saying that after studying some of my work related to Advanced Micro Devices, he has spotted a pattern: I always side with the underdog. This reader crystallized the prevalent viewpoint, one expressed by most of my co...

Apple hears price concerns

Before I get to the news of the week, I need to wrap up some old business. As I had hoped, Apple opened its OS X x86 system-level code on the first day of its Worldwide Developers Conference. That's a courageous decision. It was accompanied by the op...

WWDC - Apple eyes the enterprise at WWDC

Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) is no Mac pep rally. It's a gathering of geeks ready for a deep dive into a pool of technologies. But WWDC also has a tradition of new product intros, and last week was no exception, with two major hardw...

Ahead of the Curve: Roam the Net naked

For readers' convenience, I'd like to summarize the long list of present best practices in client-system security implemented by all InfoWorld readers. When you sit down at a client computer that's not hooked into a locked-down corporate network, you...

Ahead of the Curve: AMD talks about ATI

From the moment I got the call, I knew there was much more to AMD's acquisition of ATI than was being reported. My mind immediately leaped to the ramifications the acquisition would have on ATI's relationship with Intel OEMs. Intel couldn't be jazzed...

Ahead of the Curve: Mac is back

I imagine that some nonattendees see Apple's <a href="http://developer.apple.com/wwdc/">WWDC</a> (Worldwide Developer Convention) as a huge pep rally where Steve and the rest of the Apple brass take turns preaching to the converted. That's just wrong...

A virtualization free-for-all

Barely 10 years ago, I ventured that all systems would be virtualized, and that IT law would dictate that no operating system may have unregulated direct contact with system or storage hardware.

Ahead of the Curve: Netburst slinks away

Intel's first server-targeted core microarchitecture CPU, the Dual-core Xeon Processor 5100 (aka Woodcrest), has made its debut. A client CPU line branded Core 2 Duo launched as well, so in servers, desktops, and notebooks, Pentium 4 (aka Netburst ) ...

Latest News Articles

Most Popular Articles

Follow Us

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Resources

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?