Stories by Roger A. Grimes

It's the applications, stupid

It's always written that the first Presidential candidate Clinton posted, "It's the economy, stupid!" as a banner marquee in his campaign office during his premiere run. This saying supposedly helped focus the staff, resulting in a surprise win for t...

Control user installs of software

I've written many times over the years, including as recently as last week, that letting users execute and install their own software will always allow viruses, worms, and Trojans to be successfully installed. Traditionally, I've recommended that use...

Internet security: What will work

In the first column of this year, I discussed computer security outlook and hopes for 2008. I forecast more of the same that we saw in 2007: more spam, more malware, more bad guys basically owning the Internet and our connected computers. I don't see...

Mu Security Analyzer

I first came across the Mu Security Analyzer when a co-worker on a multi-company government project raved about how the appliance found a zero-day vulnerability in an e-mail inspection device that was protecting a top secret government agency. It was...

Ask better password questions

I just love how many Web sites take my complex, hard-to-guess password and make it as easy to crack as guessing my favorite color or the city of my birth. It seems nearly every Web site comes with user-accessible, self-service, password reset questio...

Keep security advice current

Remember when computer security was simple? Advice was as easy as, "Don't boot with a floppy drive in your A: drive" and "Don't enable the macro to run." Boy, do I long for the days of yesteryear.

Go RBAC now

Good computer security is driven by role-based, least-privilege access control. Each user should be given only the access that is necessary to perform their job -- no, make that the specific task they are performing at a specific point in time.

DNS hacked again

Amit Klein recently released details on DNS server cache poisoning attacks that affect both BIND (Berkeley Internet Name Domain) and Windows DNS servers. It goes to show that every time you think a problem with a well-known protocol or service has be...

Protect against external threats

In a previous column, I revealed how the vast majority of computer security threats facing your environment live on the client side and require end-user involvement. Users have to be socially engineered to click an item on their desktop (an e-mail, a...

Protecting the end-user

The recent OS X-specific Mac Trojan ignited many hot conversations on various security mailing lists last week. Supposedly, the excitement regarding the Trojan is that it is the first time profit-seeking criminals have paid attention to the OS X plat...

Don't laugh at Estonia -- it could happen to you

In April of this year, Estonia suffered under a huge denial-of-service attack. Lest you think that Estonia is some little, underprepared country that doesn't follow basic computer security practices, you need to know that the same thing could happen ...

Stopping malware that mutates on demand

Server-side polymorphism is a challenging problem for anti-malware software vendors. Much of today's malware, such as the Storm worm, creates tens of thousands of variants each month, a development that has made many anti-virus software programs that...

Vulnerabilities inside and out

I've often said in my columns how client-side attacks should be most administrators' No. 1 exploit worry. It's less and less common for attackers to break in through the front door. If I want to steal from a company over the Internet, it's much harde...

Trust key to Internet security

A few of my previous columns discussed my vision of creating a more secure Internet. It involved replacing the Internet's default anonymity with pervasive authentication, from the hardware initialization, through the OS and all applications, the user...

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GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

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