View CATxIP 1000

The AdderView CATxIP 1000 packs just enough punch at a sweet price for SMBs and remote offices

  • Review
  • Specs
  • Images
  • User Reviews
  • Buy Now 5
Adder View CATxIP 1000
  • Adder View CATxIP 1000
  • Adder View CATxIP 1000

Pros

  • Low-cost

Cons

  • USB ports are device-specific, maximum of four controlled power boxes

Bottom Line

The AdderView CATx1000 IP is a low-cost, no-frills IP KVM that simply does its job without any fuss.

Would you buy this?

  • Buy now (Selling at 5 stores)

See all prices

The AdderView CATxIP 1000 packs just enough punch at a sweet price for SMBs and remote offices. IP KVMs have revolutionised datacenter management, granting IT unprecedented remote access to the datacenter via a Web browser. Collocation services just wouldn’t be practical without IP KVMs and other types of remote-management technology.

The problem, however, is that vendors have taken a kitchen-sink approach to remote management. With the Avocent DSView system or the Raritan Commander, for example, you have the ability to integrate out-of-band management such as IPMI (Intelligent Platform Management Interface), iLo (Intergrated Lights-Out), DRAC (Dell Remote Access Controller), and so forth with serial consoles, power management, and other enterprise-oriented features. The end result: complex, expensive systems ill-suited for the SMB market.

There is demand out there, however, for IP KVM access to just a few servers. The AdderView CATxIP 1000 (image) from Adder is purely and simply an IP KVM that meets SMBs' remote-management needs beautifully. It doesn't deliver the tight integration of management features that you'll find in offerings from Raritan and Avocent. It also doesn't scale as well as the enterprise-oriented alternatives. But then again, the AdderView is far less expensive.

Simply splendid

Unlike the big boys who relied on custom-written ActiveX or Java applets for remote desktop control, Adder saw that VNC (virtual network computing) was already doing a better job, and it was easy to license the technology from the folks at RealVNC. So in one swoop, Adder now has IPKVM access to just about every computer platform on Earth — including my Nokia N810 Internet Tablet.

Adder also listened to the marketplace that was very tired of the huge cables found on older stand-alone KVMs taking up valuable rack space. The company replaced them with analog CAMs (computer access modules) that run the KVM over CAT5 (or better) cable from the server to the main AdderView unit for a maximum of 10 meters. That length is OK for a tabletop full of branch-office servers, but not long enough for most datacenters.

Because these CAMs are analog, care should be taken to keep them away from power feeds. From my experience with analog KVM dongles, you do not want to mix different types of cables (such as T68A versus T568B). Just mixing CAT5 with CAT6 cables on the same analog link is a formula for some truly funky connections. Moreover, Adder does not recommend using patch panels.

All major setup functions of the AdderView are performed on the physical console, eliminating the hassle of pulling out my handy USB-to-serial dongle. During setup, I noticed a couple of oddities. First, the USB ports are device-specific: Plugging a mouse into the keyboard port or vice versa won't work. I wouldn’t think that USB devices would be so particular. Second, the Ethernet port is on the front of the AdderView, which doesn't make much sense if you plan on racking these units. It would be better to have everything on the back — at least from my datacenter-centric view of the world.

Notably, there is a serial option port, which Adder suggests using to set up a daisy-chained line of controllable power boxes. With only two dipswitches to control addressing of the boxes in the chain, however, you're limited to a maximum of four controlled power boxes. I’m not sure if using DB9 cables for daisy-chaining is a good thing or bad, but seems odd when RJ-45s are in place for everything else.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Be the first to comment.

Post new comment

Users posting comments agree to the PC World comments policy.

Login or register to link comments to your user profile, or you may also post a comment without being logged in.

Latest News Articles

Most Popular Articles

Follow Us

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Resources

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?