DualSim BlueSIM desktop phone

DualSim's BlueSIM is a mobile phone accessory that looks like a regular desktop phone

  • Review
  • Specs
  • Images
  • User Reviews
  • Buy Now 5
DualSim BlueSIM
  • DualSim BlueSIM
  • DualSim BlueSIM
  • DualSim BlueSIM
  • Expert Rating

    3.25 / 5

Pros

  • Can be connected to eight mobile phones, good call quality, easy to pair and use, auto-connect, can store up to 250 contacts

Cons

  • No backlight on screen or buttons, expensive, speaker is poor for music playback, microphone for speakerphone calls doesn't have a long range

Bottom Line

Though the idea of a desktop-style phone as an accessory for your mobile phone does have some merit, we think the BlueSIM phone is a little too expensive for what it does.

Would you buy this?

  • Best Deals (Selling at 5 stores)

  • Brand Htc Desire 820 5.5 4glte 16gb Dualsim Whi... 490.00
  • Galaxy Note 3 Neo Duos N7502 Black 5.5 Dualsim ... 680.60
  • Unlocked Aspera R3d Smart Phone Tough Sport Wat... 219.00
See lowest prices

It looks like a regular desktop phone, but the DualSim BlueSIM phone actually allows the connection of up to eight Bluetooth-enabled mobile phones instead of plugging in to a landline. Apparently designed to make calls with a mobile phone from a fixed location (such as the home or office) more comfortable, the BlueSIM phone works reasonably well, but is a little too expensive to wholeheartedly recommend.

The idea of a desktop phone as a mobile phone accessory may sound strange at first, but we think the idea does have its merits. One of the situations it's most likely to prove useful is in a shared house — ditching the landline in favour of using a mobile would save you money on line rental, and you can share the BlueSIM phone (while still using individual mobiles). BlueSIM also claims the phone will decrease the risk cause by mobile phone radiation, though most evidence suggests this risk is extremely low.

The BlueSIM phone looks like a rather dull standard office phone. It's finished in a dark grey plastic, with a large silver jog dial handling most menu navigation. Like a regular office phone, it has keys to transfer the call to its built-in speakerphone, as well as basic mute and redial functions. The small LCD screen is easy enough to read, though it only shows four lines of text, and the lack of a backlight (either on the display or the dialling keys themselves) means late night calls will require the aid of a light or lamp.

Pairing the BlueSIM with your mobile is a straightforward process. Simply plug in the included AC adapter, use the menu to put it in pairing mode and connect it to your mobile. We tested the BlueSIM phone with an iPhone 3GS, but it will work with most Bluetooth-enabled mobiles. Once your phone is connected, the BlueSIM has an option to auto-connect, meaning every time you come within Bluetooth range of the phone (usually 10 metres), it will automatically connect to your mobile. It will also keep track of any missed and received calls and dialled numbers.

Making a call is as easy as picking up the BlueSIM handset and dialling a phone number. The lack of dial tone seems odd at first, but calls are relatively loud and crisp, provided your mobile phone has good coverage. Outgoing audio is also loud and clear, with our callers offering no complaints on our voice quality or volume during test calls. The built-in speakerphone is less than impressive though — the microphone didn't manage to pick up our voice from a reasonable length away, with outgoing audio sounding distant standing a mere metre from the BlueSIM phone.

A nifty feature is the ability to copy the contacts from your mobile phone into the BlueSIM phone. However, the built-in memory can only store 250 contacts, and these contacts are available to all users of the BlueSIM phone. A not so useful feature is the ability to play music stored on your mobile phone through the BlueSIM's speaker. Though the speaker works reasonably well for phone calls, it sounds distorted when used for music playback.

Become a fan of GoodGearGuide on Facebook

Follow GoodGearGuide on Twitter: @GoodGearGuide

Stay up to date with the latest reviews. Sign up to GoodGearGuide’s Gear Daily newsletters

Struggling for Christmas presents this year? Check out our Christmas Gift Guide for some top tech suggestions and more.

Join the PC World newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Read more on these topics: mobile phone accessories, dualsim, mobile phones

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?