Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon (type 3444-2NM) Ultrabook review

Those of you looking for a business-ready Ultrabook will love the ThinkPad X1 Carbon

  • Review
  • Specs
  • Images
  • User Reviews
  • Buy Now 17
  • Broadband Plans
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon Ultrabook (type 3444-2NM)
  • Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon Ultrabook (type 3444-2NM)
  • Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon Ultrabook (type 3444-2NM)
  • Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon Ultrabook (type 3444-2NM)

Pros

  • Build quality
  • Keyboard
  • Large, smooth touchpad
  • Fast SSD

Cons

  • Vertical viewing angles a little narrow
  • RAM not upgradeable
  • Non-standard SSD
  • Pricey

Bottom Line

Lenovo's ThinkPad X1 Carbon is aimed at business users who need an Ultrabook management features and better security than a standard model. It's well built, quite comfortable to use, and performs quite well. However, it's not a user-serviceable unit and it could also use a screen with better vertical viewing angles.

Would you buy this?

  • Buy now (Selling at 17 stores)

  • Thinkpad Edge E440 Laptop core i3-4000M 2.4Ghz ... 599.00
  • ThinkPad X1 Carbon Touchscreen - i7Build Your Own 2649.00
  • Thinkpad Edge 540 Laptop 4th Gen i3-4000M 2.40G... 749.00
See all prices

If there's one word that you can't use to describe the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon, it's soft. On the contrary, it's one of the toughest, if not the current toughest 14in Ultrabook on the Australian market, and a lot of that is due to its construction, which features carbon fibre in both the chassis and the lid.

Design and build quality

The carbon fibre construction, combined with solid state storage, means that the X1 Carbon can withstand accidental knocks and drops better than most other Ultrabooks. Meanwhile, its spill resistant keyboard and weep holes allow it to survive moderate-to-substantial liquid mishaps.

Apart from that toughness, it's an Ultrabook with a very good keyboard, plenty of processing power and, dare we say it, good looks. Some compromises have been made in regards to onboard connectivity, but compensation is provided in the form of supplied dongles for VGA and Ethernet. Built in to the base are two USB ports (one which is USB 3.0 and one which is USB 2.0), a full-sized SD card slot, a combination microphone and headphone port, a mini-DisplayPort and an externally-accessible SIM card slot (for the integrated mobile broadband in our test model).

A new style of power connector has been designed for this ThinkPad, primarily to fit the thickness of the chassis, which is about 11mm not counting the rubber stops and the lid. The power connecter is a rectangle instead of a circle and it can be plugged in either way around. It's a very smooth and good looking connector and it's attached to a hefty power brick that's designed to charge the ThinkPad X1 Carbon is very quick time. Other features of the chassis include a physical Wi-Fi toggle, which we love, an extraction vent on the left side and stereo speakers that are inconspicuous, yet produce above-average output in terms of clarity and volume for a notebook of this size and thickness. Dedicated volume buttons are also present.

You get a sense of the X1 Carbon's build quality the moment you pull it out of the box. Despite weighing less than 1.4kg, it feels very sturdy overall, and especially when the lid is closed. It's also very well balanced — there isn't excessive weight towards the rear of the notebook. Furthermore, it feels good to hold thanks to its matte finish, which provides plenty of grip so that the notebook won't slip if you pick it up with one hand. The design of the base tapers towards the front, which gives the Ultrabook a sporty look while it's sitting on a desk, and the thickness of the chassis is different from the front to the back due to the bigger rubber stops that reside near the spine of the chassis. With the lid closed, the X1 Carbon is 22mm thick at the rear (including the stops) and 16mm thick at the front.

Left side: power port, vent, USB 2.0, Wi-Fi toggle.Left side: power port, vent, USB 2.0, Wi-Fi toggle.

Right side: cable lock slot, USB 3.0, mini-DisplayPort, audio jack, SD card slot.Right side: cable lock slot, USB 3.0, mini-DisplayPort, audio jack, SD card slot.

The supplied VGA and 100Mbps Ethernet dongles. There is an option for a USB 3.0-based port replicator as well.The supplied VGA and 100Mbps Ethernet dongles. There is an option for a USB 3.0-based port replicator as well.

You can't lift the lid open with one hand while the notebook is sitting flat on a desk; the hinges are simply too strong. Conveniently, the hinges do allow the screen to be tilted all the way back until it is lying flat, which we think is useful for a variety of scenarios, from typing notes while standing up (we have been known to do that with Ultrabooks in the past — but mainly the lighter ones such as the Toshiba Satellite), to giving presentations without having the screen obscure your view.

The screen itself measures 14in diagonally and has a native resolution of 1600x900. A matte finish ensures that reflections from light sources behind you won't be a big problem, and there is enough brightness and contrast to make photos and videos look absolutely great. However, the panel has vertical viewing angles that are a little shallow and, depending on the angle at which you are sitting relative to the screen's height, you might end up having to tilt the screen a lot in order to fix contrast and brightness issues. Don't bank on being able to see the screen easily if you tilt it all the way back flat on a desk — unless you are standing up. The limited viewing angles of the screen are perhaps the most disappointing aspect of the X1 Carbon, but despite that, the screen is still of very high quality.

Keyboard and touchpad

For input, the X1 Carbon features Lenovo's famous dual-pointing solution, which is comprised of a TrackPoint in the middle of the keyboard and a large touchpad just below the keyboard. The keyboard itself is a joy to type on. The keys are big, well spaced and they provide an impressive amount of travel considering how thin the chassis is. You get a lot more travel than on other Ultrabooks. Furthermore, the keys feel soft to press and their responsiveness is excellent.

The spill resistant keyboardThe spill resistant keyboard

Water spilled on the keyboard makes its way through channels and exits through the slits you can see on the left and right sides.Water spilled on the keyboard makes its way through channels and exits through the slits you can see on the left and right sides.

You get a dedicated Print Screen key on the bottom row, there are clearly marked Home, End, Insert and Delete keys at the top, and there are conveniently placed Page Up and Page Down keys just above the left and right arrow keys. However, we do wish the arrow keys were slightly bigger and more spaced out. We like the fact that the keyboard is backlit — there are two intensities to choose from — but there is no timer to switch off the light during idle times. The light is off by default, which means you have to switch it on every time you restart the computer or come out of sleep mode.

The touchpad is 101x61mm and it's one of those clickpad-type devices in which the left- and right-click buttons are located underneath the pad itself. A very smooth finish ensures that your finger will easily slide across the pad and, in fact, we think this is one of the smoothest touchpads on the market. However, the pad did rattle a little when it was tapped. We should point out that we had to update the touchpad driver during our tests. We initially noticed some tracking problems and inaccuracy when tapping. These problems were fixed when we updated the driver from Lenovo's Web site. Two-finger scrolling and three-finger gestures were performed without any problems, and the pad is big enough so that four-finger swipes are also very easy to perform.

One other thing to note is that the touchpad is almost exactly level with the palm rest, which means that with a future driver update, it should be able to support swipe-in gestures that will allow you to more easily make use of the Charms bar and the Switcher in the Windows 8 interface — should you want to upgrade to that operating system.

Configuration and performance

The configuration of the ThinkPad X1 that we tested was anchored by a third generation Intel Core i5-3427U CPU, which is an ultra-low voltage CPU with two cores, Hyper-Threading and a frequency of 1.8GHz. It features Intel HD 4000 graphics, and it was joined by 8GB of DDR3 SDRAM and a 256GB solid state drive (a non-standard SanDisk SD5SG2256G1052E model). It's a configuration that can supply an ample amount of power for office and Web tasks, as well as multimedia playback and encoding tasks (although it's not really designed to be used for taxing processing tasks).

In our Blender3D rendering and iTunes MP3 encoding tests, the Carbon X1 put up times of 45sec and 52sec, which are faster times than the other Core i5-based Ultrabooks we have tested. This was expected due to the slightly faster frequency of the CPU. Its time of 56min in our AutoGordianKnot DVD-to-Xvid conversion test is the same as other Ultrabooks we've tested recently, including the Toshiba Satellite Z930 and HP Envy Spectre XT, both of which feature a slower Core i5-3317U CPU. Its time of 11min 16sec in our DVD-to-MKV test using Arcsoft Media Converter 7 is about 2min faster than what those Ultrabooks could manage in the same test.

Graphics performance was faster than what we've seen from other Core i5-based Ultrabooks, again due to the higher processor frequency, and this was shown in 3DMark06, where a mark of 5405 was attained. This is about 200 marks better than what we're used to seeing.

In the storage department, the X1 Carbon's solid state drive is very fast. In CrystalDiskMark, it put up a read rate of 486.9 megabytes per second (MBps) and a write rate of 421.3MBps. In our own file duplication tests, an average rate of 128.09MBps was achieved. Compared to other Ultrabooks with 256GB solid state drives that we've seen, such as the Dell XPS 13, ASUS Zenbook Prime and Toshiba Portege Z930, the X1 Carbon is an Ultrabook to be reckoned with. Its read rate was not quite as fast as the Toshiba in CrystalDiskMark, but its write rate is so far the quickest we seen. The Dell still holds the fastest file duplication rate. The drive has a 215GB capacity, with almost 14GB reserved for the recovery partition.

Boot times were a little on the sluggish side in our tests; we recorded a cold boot time of 23sec. Resume time was about 2.5sec, while deep sleep resume was about 5sec. Under a full load, the fan kicked in to remove the warm air generated by the CPU, but it wasn't overly loud; during regular usage, it was a very quiet operator. We also didn't notice too much warmth from the chassis after prolonged periods of basic usage. There is a vent on the bottom that you will need to be mindful not to block if you use the Carbon on your lap for long periods of time.

Battery life

The X1 Carbon has an internal battery that isn't easily removable (seven Phillips head screws hold the cover to the base), but it's a battery that can supply the Ultrabook with ample time away from a power outlet. In our rundown test, in which we disable power management, enable Wi-Fi, maximise screen brightness and loop an Xvid-encoded video, the Carbon lasted 4hr 49min. It's a better result than the previous best Ultrabook in this test, the Sony VAIO T Series, which lasted 4hr 30min, but that Ultrabook also had a slightly more powerful 1.9GHz Core i7 CPU.

When we used the Carbon for casual Web surfing, the odd YouTube video and office document creation tasks, it lasted a little over six hours. This was with a screen brightness just under the halfway mark and with the keyboard backlight predominantly off. How much you get out of the standard battery will depend on your usage and power scheme.

The battery can be charged at a rapid rate once it's depleted. In our tests, it reached 80 per cent capacity in about half an hour and it took just over an hour to charge completely. This was achieved with a 90W power supply. Lenovo says that this rapid charging feature won't reduce the battery's charging cycles over time any quicker than a regular battery with a standard charging time. To this end, it supports the battery with the same warranty as the laptop itself, which can be up to three years if you choose that option (for an extra fee).

If you wanted to replace the battery yourself, you would have to spend some time fiddling with wires and ribbon cables. The cover of the unit pops off without much of an effort after you remove the seven screws. The components are held in the bottom part of the chassis and it is the keyboard that lifts up to expose them. You have to be mindful of the ribbon cable that attaches the input peripherals to the motherboard, but it's the type of cable that will pop off if you pull it a little too much accidentally, rather than offer resistance.

The way the Carbon opens is like lifting the bonnet of a car. With the screws removed, the keyboard lifts up to reveal the battery and motherboard.The way the Carbon opens is like lifting the bonnet of a car. With the screws removed, the keyboard lifts up to reveal the battery and motherboard.

You can see the sealed, white keyboard tray that's designed to channel liquid spills away from the components underneath it.You can see the sealed, white keyboard tray that's designed to channel liquid spills away from the components underneath it.

Here is the CPU cooler. You can also see the ribbon cable that attaches the USB 2.0 port to the motherboard, and also the soldered RAM just above the CPU heat sink (the RAM is fixed and can't be upgraded or replaced).Here is the CPU cooler. You can also see the ribbon cable that attaches the USB 2.0 port to the motherboard, and also the soldered RAM just above the CPU heat sink (the RAM is fixed and can't be upgraded or replaced).

In the foreground is the battery. You can also see all the cables that need to be negotiated if you want to replace the battery yourself. You can also see the non-standard SSD just above the battery on the right side, and the mobile broadband and wireless modules just above the SSD.In the foreground is the battery. You can also see all the cables that need to be negotiated if you want to replace the battery yourself. You can also see the non-standard SSD just above the battery on the right side, and the mobile broadband and wireless modules just above the SSD.

The speaker chambers are on the sides and the speakers fire downwards. Despite this, the audio from the Carbon is very good.The speaker chambers are on the sides and the speakers fire downwards. Despite this, the audio from the Carbon is very good.

Conclusion

Other features of the X1 Carbon include a webcam and dual integrated microphones (on either side of the webcam), Bluetooth, dual-band Wi-Fi (Intel Centrino Advanced-N 6205S), and mobile broadband and GPS (H5321 gw). We had no problems at all using the laptop on the Optus network with our iiNet SIM card. All we had to do was enter the correct APN through the Windows networking interface and we were up and running. We got a download rate of about 3 megabits per second on this network in our test area in North Sydney.

For security, the Carbon has an integrated fingerprint reader and for management it features a vPro chipset. It's one of the few vPro-capable Ultrabooks on the market, but more will become available as the Ultrabook finds its way into the enterprise.

Overall, this Ultrabook is a beauty. We love the sturdy feel and the very comfortable keyboard, and we had no problems using it after we updated the touchpad drivers and got used to the screen's vertical viewing angles. It proved to be a swift and reliable performer, although we do think it has a few too many bits of pre-installed software. Even though it isn't a user serviceable unit, if you're in business (or even if you're not and you just want a top-notch Ultrabook), then the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon is a good one to go for.

Related notebook reviews:

Toshiba Satellite Z930 Ultrabook
Toshiba Portege Z930 Ultrabook
Sony VAIO T Series Ultrabook
HP Envy Spectre XT Ultrabook
Toshiba Satellite U840W Ultrabook
Origin EON15-S gaming notebook
Dell Inspiron 15R 5520 Ivy Bridge notebook
Medion Akoya P6635 Ivy Bridge notebook
HP Envy 6-1001tx Ultrabook
HP Pavilion dv6-7030tx Ivy Bridge notebook
Sony VAIO E Series 14P Ivy Bridge notebook
ASUS Zenbook Prime UX31A Ultrabook
Fujitsu Lifebook U772 Ivy Bridge Ultrabook
Dell XPS 14 Ivy Bridge Ultrabook
Samsung Series 9 Ultrabook
Lenovo ThinkPad X230 Ivy Bridge laptop
Apple MacBook Pro (15in with Retina display)
ASUS N56VM Ivy Bridge laptop
Acer Aspire Timeline Ultra M3 Ultrabook
Lenovo ThinkPad Edge E530 Ivy Bridge laptop
Dell XPS 13 Ultrabook

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

John

1

Yes it is a good looking notebook but what they neglect to mention is the hefty rrp price of over $3000 Australian.

Josh

2

Just wondering, does the internal mobile module support Telstra NextG? I'd quite happily buy this laptop and a prepaid mobile broadband service from Telstra to keep it connected, but given that it's a different frequency, quite often devices that support Optus and Vodafone don't support Telstra.

Jorgen S

3

Thanks for a great review; you go into a lot of detail which is appreciated. I have had the X1C i7/256/8 myself now for a few months, and completely love it. It is light, cool and a great performer - especially so with Ubuntu 12.10 or Windows 8, which I'm dual booting with secure boot enabled (just tap F12 to choose boot device on startup).

I even got a small Amaysim $100 1 year 10GB pre-paid sim that I put in it and on the few occasions when I've needed it, it's been absolutely great. I can just forget it's there, not having to worry about taking a dongle etc.

Further to this the keyboard is sensational, and the same goes for the screen for my usage as a programmer. My son actually splashed a small amount of water on the keyboard last night, so I was happy to recall the water proofing efforts that had been put into the design. I still turned it off, wiped it and left it to dry out properly. :)

karolszk

4

Jorgen, on askubuntu I saw that USB/Etherned dongle doesn't work on Linux... do you confirm that or not? I will be appreciated..

Post new comment

Users posting comments agree to the PC World comments policy.

Login or register to link comments to your user profile, or you may also post a comment without being logged in.

Latest News Articles

Most Popular Articles

Follow Us

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Resources

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Compare broadband and save

Powered by

Need Help? Call 1300 123 935

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?