Microsoft System Center Essentials 2010

Microsoft System Center Essentials 2010 is a systems management suite for midsize businesses that comprises part of Microsoft System Center 2010.

  • Review
  • Specs
  • Images
  • User Reviews
  • Buy Now 13
Microsoft System Center Essentials 2010

Pros

  • Improved fault tolerance, support for "roaming laptops", self-service recovery

Cons

  • Not much in the way of cross-platform support

Bottom Line

Micosoft System Center Essentials 2010 adds some welcome touches to update deployment and removes a lot of the mystique around how to deploy virtualisation technology in the middle market. It can also save staffers a lot of time through better monitoring and better software installation methods. The redesigned interface is simple and comfortable, and the product's limitations are few - and all in all, it's appropriate for a product that's lighter than the full System Center suite. On the other hand, it's not right for your business if you're already in the upper bounds of the projected user range (more than 400 PCs), if you run a very heterogeneous environment either on the client or on the server, or if virtualisation isn't at the top of your company's to-do list.

Would you buy this?

  • Price

    TBA (AUD)
  • Buy now (Selling at 13 stores)

  • Hawker Hunter Flight Simulator X 2004 Add On Ga... 25.99
  • DC-2 Flight Simulator X 2004 Add On Game PC 36.99
  • American Champion Aircraft Flight Simulator X 2... 26.49
See all prices

Microsoft System Center Essentials 2010

System Center Essentials 2010 is the latest revision to the integrated systems management suite designed for midsize businesses. Microsoft already offers the full System Center suite for enterprises but has recently focused on filling the gap that often exists between product offerings for tiny shops with fewer than 25 people and global corporations with 5,000-plus users.

Microsoft has a pretty wide definition of what a midsize business looks like: It suspects such a business has between 25 and 400 PCs and five to 50 servers, doesn't already have systems management software, has fewer than five IT generalists in its internal support operation and predominantly uses Microsoft software. (Clearly that's a model picture in Microsoft's view.) Obviously, this vision is a bit more likely in the smaller end of that space, with more heterogeneity probable in the upper end of the midsize market.

In any event, Essentials 2010 is designed to help make an environment not managed by specialists every bit as efficient and healthy as one that is. Essentials 2010 attempts to achieve three key goals:

  • Monitor the total environment of a network and proactively alert administrators to, and sometimes automatically fix, problems that crop up - anywhere from a client PC to a server to a piece of software.
  • Deploy software and patches in an efficient, streamlined way, rather than sneakernetting CDs and DVDs around the office.
  • Integrate virtualisation strategies and techniques into a market that traditionally hasn't been ready for that complexity.

Microsoft System Center Essentials 2010: The interface

Essentials 2010's interface will be comfortable for Outlook users; the team redesigned the interface to be more fluid and expose more functionality with fewer clicks. The administrative console is easy to navigate. Thanks to the comprehensive task list that appears in the pane on the right, we didn't spend a lot of time looking for features.

Microsoft System Center Essentials 2010: Updates and software deployment

Essentials 2010 integrates Windows Server Update Services more fully with Essentials' administrative console, monitoring capabilities and deployment features.

At its core, WSUS attempts to automate the patching process as much as possible. Between Essentials and WSUS, the tools can discover which updates are required in your environment and set auto-approval deadlines for update deployment; these are the dates at which a particular update will automatically be deployed, even without an administrator's explicit approval.

Another feature is the ability to perform those update installations according to the class of machine - workstation or server. Since patching is likely a manual process in these environments, Essentials tries to take the menial work out of the task and improve system health. In the end, it works pretty well.

Essentials also attempts to make the process of deploying software much more streamlined than running software discs around an office. It puts an attractive, easy-to-use interface around Group Policy-based software deployment and also adds some intelligence found in the suite's big brother, System Center Configuration Manager, so that pushing out Office to 150 clients, for example, doesn't take weeks.

We found the deployment wizards much simpler to understand than the native Windows Server/Active Directory tools. The additional capabilities for non-Microsoft Installer-based software packages not found natively in Windows are also welcome.

Microsoft System Center Essentials 2010: Supporting virtualisation in the midmarket

The virtualization phenomenon is in full swing, and one could reasonably wonder why Essentials 2010 took as long as it did to integrate virtual machine technology into its core. Quibbling aside, in Essentials 2010 Microsoft has added virtualization hand-holding for the IT generalist: there are wizards to perform many common VM-related tasks, including building new virtual machines from scratch and importing existing VMs into the Essentials management console, with support for both Microsoft's VHD format and VMware's folders. Templates can be used when creating VMs to achieve consistent performance and "spec'ing" of your VM farms, and a tool that intelligently decides the best host for a particular VM is included as well.

Converting existing physical machines to VMs, a process known as P2V, can be handled from within the Essentials 2010 console. And once the VMs are created and placed, and the Essentials agent installed on them, they can of course be managed and monitored like any computer on the network. You can also live-migrate VMs as well (that is, move a virtual machine from one host to another without any downtime).

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Read more on these topics: Microsoft, virtualisation, system management

Be the first to comment.

Post new comment

Users posting comments agree to the PC World comments policy.

Login or register to link comments to your user profile, or you may also post a comment without being logged in.

Latest News Articles

Most Popular Articles

Follow Us

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Resources

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?