Nintendo Australia Wario Ware: Smooth Moves

  • Review
  • Specs
  • Images
  • User Reviews
  • Buy Now
Nintendo Australia Wario Ware: Smooth Moves

Pros

  • The Wii Remote is put to good use in fun and humiliating ways

Cons

  • Smooth Moves can be completed in about an hour, doesn't support multiple controls for multiplayer

Bottom Line

All in all, WarioWare: Smooth Moves is a certifiably insane party game that is a must buy for any Wii owner and just further proves that the Wii is the must-have console for when you have friends over.

Would you buy this?

Mario's evil twin makes his triumphant debut on the Nintendo Wii, demonstrating that there are more fun ways to use your Wii Remote than you can count on both hands.

WarioWare: Smooth Moves will please fans of the yellow-clad doppelganger's series and will suck in gamers new to the WarioWare franchise.

WeirdoWare

Let's get this out of the way -- Smooth Moves is not Wii Sports. Although there are 200-plus "microgames" that you can participate in, the games in WarioWare: Smooth Moves are extremely simple and you're not going to be spending more than a few seconds playing them. But this is definitely not a bad thing. The rapid-fire pace of the game is one of the many things that makes it so enjoyable. It's nearly impossible to get tired of any one particular microgame because none of them stay long enough to wear out their welcome.

The game starts out with Wario relaxing on his sofa chair when all of a sudden a tiny being makes off with his junk food stash. The creature leads Wario to an ancient temple, harking back to Raiders of the Lost Ark, where he discovers the weird and wonderful "form baton".

That's about all the sense you can make of the story as it then goes on to explore the adventures of a blue afro-sporting maniac who likes to dance with kittens, a couple of cabbies named Dribble and Spitz, and even an army of miniaturised clones of Wario himself. When you're not entirely engrossed in WarioWare's addictive gameplay, often times you'll be laughing at the absurdity of what is on the screen.

You do what with your Wii Remote?

It's hard to imagine the sequel to Smooth Moves (or any game for that matter) being able to create more uses for the Wii Remote. You start off with The Remote Control form, which is when you point the controller's sensor towards the screen, but soon after this you will be using the Wii Remote in ways only someone as whacked out of their skull as Wario could think up.

The microgames you'll play in Smooth Moves force you to make a total ass of yourself, as you'll turn the Wii Remote into everything from an elephant trunk to a samurai sword. You'll use the controller to pick a massive nose, saw logs in half, wave a fart cloud away, and partake in tons of other nutty activities. In addition to the couple hundred microgames included in Smooth Moves, there are also a few more elaborate games that will keep you occupied for more than a few seconds, such as the NES-esque Can Shooter and a Breakout-type game that involves a ping pong paddle. These games have multiple levels and can keep you busy (and cursing at the TV) for hours.

Fun for one

Even though a "multiplayer" mode can be unlocked by beating the game, players must use the same controller. In one of the multiplayer games, one player uses the Wii Remote, while the other uses the Nunchuk to jump over potholes and hurdles in unison.

Using the same controller (or controller set) to play with friends increases the insanity of Smooth Moves' multiplayer games, but passing around the controller gets old fast and the game would have been that much better if it supported multiple controllers. Plus, this really isn't a multiplayer mode -- you can take turns using a controller with any video game. Another small snag in the game is that it can be completed in about an hour if you really zip through it, but the replay value more than makes up for this minor booboo.

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Recommended

Be the first to comment.

Post new comment

Users posting comments agree to the PC World comments policy.

Login or register to link comments to your user profile, or you may also post a comment without being logged in.

Most Popular Reviews

Follow Us

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Shopping.com

Latest News Articles

Resources

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?