Reallusion iClone Pro 3

In its two previous iterations, iClone was a low-end 3D animation suite.

  • Review
  • Specs
  • Images
  • User Reviews
  • Buy Now 18
Reallusion iClone Pro 3
  • Reallusion iClone Pro 3
  • Reallusion iClone Pro 3
  • Reallusion iClone Pro 3

Pros

  • Relatively inexpensive; real-time interactive engine; enhanced actors; tree, plants and grass system; particles; independent, transferrable animation on characters, MPEG4 and Flash Video export

Cons

  • Requires iClone 3DXchange2 to import 3D objects not from Reallusion’s content store; manual could be improved

Bottom Line

hough obviously not aimed at the high-end film CG market, iClone Pro makes a great pre-viz toolkit.

Would you buy this?

In its two previous iterations, iClone was a low-end 3D animation suite, pitching itself at enthusiasts who were happy to work primarily with pre-built components. With the release of version 3, Reallusion has added a Pro version for quickly putting together 3D scenes for pre-visualization.

Reallusion offers content to create your iClone movies, including characters, props, vehicles, trees and plants and terrain. As with Smith Micro’s Poser and DAZ Studio, you can quickly link to new content available to buy online, while a new ‘live access’ feature lets you try before you buy. However, you can only import external 3D models using the 3DXchange2 application that ships with the boxed Pro version.

Two authoring modes are available. In Editor mode, you place actors in a 3D scene, using the scene manager tabs to add props, terrain, water and multiple cameras, as well as a high-quality dynamic lighting system. iClone’s actors have become more sophisticated with the new version, offering a smoother body shape and normal maps for greater skin detail and finer texture, without increasing the polygon face count. Bump maps can also add wrinkles to heads created with the facial lab feature.

There are new Dynamic Spring Objects, such as tails, antennae, blobs and eyes, which can bounce with the actor’s motion. Poses and actions can be dropped directly onto actors to add motion to the scene, and several actions can be performed in a linear fashion. Props, too, can have animation embedded, so actors can interact automatically with compatible vehicles, for example.

A floating timeline lets you assemble a series of motion clips together, fine-tuning the clips by tweaking positions of the actors bones via the Motion Layer feature. The timeline could do with being dockable, but it offers the ability to edit animated properties for multiple actors, lights and cameras.

Director mode allows you to record a movie while you navigate your scene, with actors and props moving automatically and effects rendered as if you were in a game. Export options include image sequence, HD AVI and transparent Flash Video iWidgets for Web export. This mode offers higher-quality scenes and controls than we were expecting, displaying content in a realtime 3D viewer with a variety of shading settings. The most advanced of these is pixel shading, which offers effects such as reflection maps and refraction effects, translucent water, fog, self-illumination and shadows, depth of field and animated textures.

You can customize props and terrains, and import 2D pictures as image layers and backgrounds. While the vegetation is not a patch on Solid Growth in Vue, trees can be attached to any terrain or prop, cast shadows and sway in the wind. Grasses can be planted using an instancing feature, grown from seed templates and only fully rendered in Director mode. You can add a variation setting to the parameters in the Dimension section of the Modify panel, and even use a mower gizmo to cut the grass to the appropriate length.

There are limitations – for example, you can only apply one terrain to each project, so you would have to record a scene for each set, then assemble the results in a video-editing package. There’s also a maximum time for recording of 18,000 frames. The controls also take a bit of getting used to, especially if you’re used to animating characters in something like Maya. T

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Be the first to comment.

Post new comment

Users posting comments agree to the PC World comments policy.

Login or register to link comments to your user profile, or you may also post a comment without being logged in.

Latest News Articles

Most Popular Articles

Follow Us

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Resources

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?