Western Digital VelociRaptor WD6000HLHX hard drive

The newest WD VelociRaptor offers 600GB of storage as well as a 10,000rpm spin

  • Review
  • Specs
  • Images
  • User Reviews
  • Buy Now 1
Western Digital VelociRaptor WD6000HLHX
  • Western Digital VelociRaptor WD6000HLHX
  • Western Digital VelociRaptor WD6000HLHX
  • Western Digital VelociRaptor WD6000HLHX

Pros

  • Excellent file transfer speeds, 600GB capacity, 10,000 RPM spin speed

Cons

  • It's not the quietest hard drive on the market

Bottom Line

The WD VelociRaptor WD6000HLHX is a blistering fast hard drive that will suit high-end gaming rigs and multimedia PCs. At 600GB, it also provides reasonable bang for your buck.

Would you buy this?

  • Buy now (Selling at 1 store)

The latest addition to Western Digital’s VelociRaptor range doubles the storage capacity of the previous model and adds a SATA III interface. The new WD VelociRaptor WD6000HLHX 6 Gb/s SATA stands out as a heavyweight hard drive for high-end gaming and multimedia PCs. It boasts 600GB of storage, a 10,000rpm spin speed, 32 MB cache and agile transfer speeds within a small 3.5inch frame.

Western Digital promises a 15 per cent increase in performance over the last rendition of the VelociRaptor (the VelociRaptor WD3000BLFS). With an RRP of just $399 (66 cents per formatted gigabyte), WD VelociRaptor WD6000HLHX is a good buy for anyone looking to push their computer to its limit.

While some larger capacity hard drives offer more gigs for your buck, the extra cents here go toward speeding up the disk, achieving read and write speeds of over 100 megabytes per second in some cases.

We conducted two file transfer tests with the drive while connected to a testbed running a 300GB WD3000GLFS VelociRaptor drive. The first test consisted of 3GB worth of 1MB files, which simulates installing applications and backing up system files. In the second test we use a 20GB folder of 3-4GB files; this is more akin to dealing with high-definition movies.

Here is how the results compared to other hard drives on the market:

Small File (3GB) Transfer Test Results
Model Price Storage Capacity Memory
type
Read
speed (MBps)
Write
speed (MBps)
Read/write
speed (MBps)
WD VelociRaptor WD6000HLHX $399 600GB SLC 47.6 69.8 50.8
Solidata K6-32 SSD $199 32GB MLC 46.9 38.9 25.4
Apacer A7 Turbo SSD $309 64GB MLC 50 36.1 37.5
Solidata K5-32 SSD $359 32GB SLC 50.6 34.1 26.8
Kingston SSDNow V+ SSD $445 64GB MLC 49.2 50 56.6
Kingston SSDNow M Series $855 80GB MLC 49.2 50 56.6
Intel X25-M SSD N/A 80GB MLC 49.2 49.2 66.7

Large File (20GB) Transfer Test Results
Model Price Storage Capacity Memory
type
Read
speed (MBps)
Write
speed (MBps)
Read/write
speed (MBps)
WD VelociRaptor WD6000HLHX $399 600GB SLC 102.1 78.5 53.4
Solidata K6-32 SSD $199 32GB MLC 35.9 71.1 24.8
Seagate Momentus 7200.4 HDD $217 500GB Hard drive 85.99 77.2 25.63
Apacer A7 Turbo SSD $309 64GB MLC 77.9 64.7 68.3
Solidata K5-32 SSD $359 32GB SLC 76.9 42.4 37.1
Kingston SSDNow V+ SSD $445 64GB MLC 76.6 77.29 75.2
Kingston SSDNow M Series $855 80GB MLC 73.09 71.04 52.49
Intel X25-M SSD N/A 80GB MLC 76.1 74 87.8

The unit itself is a small 2.5 inches, though is housed by a 3.5 inch heat sink that’ll keep the device running cool in long and high-intensity computing sessions. While it’ll stay cool, it won’t stay quiet. While transferring on and off the drive, the unit was noticeably noisy, with its spinning parts sounding more like a computer case fan; it's louder than the previous VelociRaptor hard drive. Evidently, this is a by-product of packing double the storage capacity into the same size unit. As a high speed drive, the best performance is harnessed when packed into a high-end PC with other drives that run at 10,000rpm rather than the more common 7200rpm.

The VelociRaptor series are typically expensive compared to other, larger hard drives, but the latest version bridges the price gap by offering double the capacity, halving the per gigabyte price. Even the smaller capacity VelociRaptors were unparalleled for high-speed computing, so the extra 300GB on top is simply improving on an already high-end product.

Become a fan of PC World Australia on Facebook

Follow PC World Australia on Twitter: @PCWorldAu

Stay up to date with the latest news, reviews and features. Sign up to PC World’s newsletters

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Read more on these topics: hard drives, WD, storage, western digital

Be the first to comment.

Post new comment

Users posting comments agree to the PC World comments policy.

Login or register to link comments to your user profile, or you may also post a comment without being logged in.

Latest News Articles

Most Popular Articles

Follow Us

GGG Evaluation Team

Kathy Cassidy

STYLISTIC Q702

First impression on unpacking the Q702 test unit was the solid feel and clean, minimalist styling.

Anthony Grifoni

STYLISTIC Q572

For work use, Microsoft Word and Excel programs pre-installed on the device are adequate for preparing short documents.

Steph Mundell

LIFEBOOK UH574

The Fujitsu LifeBook UH574 allowed for great mobility without being obnoxiously heavy or clunky. Its twelve hours of battery life did not disappoint.

Andrew Mitsi

STYLISTIC Q702

The screen was particularly good. It is bright and visible from most angles, however heat is an issue, particularly around the Windows button on the front, and on the back where the battery housing is located.

Simon Harriott

STYLISTIC Q702

My first impression after unboxing the Q702 is that it is a nice looking unit. Styling is somewhat minimalist but very effective. The tablet part, once detached, has a nice weight, and no buttons or switches are located in awkward or intrusive positions.

Resources

Best Deals on GoodGearGuide

Compare & Save

Deals powered by WhistleOut
WhistleOut

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?