A Java truce could lead to XML war

The ongoing cold war between the proponents of Java and the folks in Redmond, Washington, is showing signs of thawing. Driving that process is a realisation within Microsoft that there's not much it can do at this point to halt Java's momentum. In fact, the biggest story at last week's JavaOne conference was the sheer number of developers who showed up. For the first time, the attendance at a Java conference easily rivalled attendance at any Microsoft Professional Developer's Conference.

Until the release date for NT 5.0 started slipping, Microsoft had hoped to establish the Distributed Component Object Model and the Microsoft Transaction Server as de facto standards before Enterprise JavaBeans architectures could take hold. That doesn't seem likely anymore. That's why Microsoft needs to take a more conciliatory approach toward Enterprise Java in the form of alliances with middleware companies.

But that's only a short-term strategy borne out of necessity. IT managers can expect to see Microsoft promote the Extensible Markup Language (XML) as the great new cure for everything that ails the Web and the industry as whole.

No, Microsoft hasn't suddenly seen the open standards light. It's just that Redmond would rather rally behind any standard but Java.

This isn't necessarily a bad thing. Java has enough momentum to carry it forward, and XML, as a context-rich, data-neutral file format, is probably the most important new technology development of the last two years. The key task for customers will be to throw their weight behind the developing World Wide Web Consortium specifications for XML in order to prevent any vendor from deploying de facto extensions that would undermine the real value of XML.

So the question is, are IT managers willing to be proactive about influencing the guidance of new XML data formats, or are they going to sit back and let the same haphazard process that clouded the development of HTML, Java and a host of other technologies continue to rule the day?

(Write to me at michael_vizard@infoworld.com.)

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.
Show Comments

Cool Tech

Toys for Boys

Family Friendly

Stocking Stuffer

SmartLens - Clip on Phone Camera Lens Set of 3

Learn more >

Christmas Gift Guide

Click for more ›

Brand Post

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Michael Hargreaves

Microsoft Office 365/Dell XPS 15 2-in-1

I’d recommend a Dell XPS 15 2-in-1 and the new Windows 10 to anyone who needs to get serious work done (before you kick back on your couch with your favourite Netflix show.)

Maryellen Rose George

Brother PT-P750W

It’s useful for office tasks as well as pragmatic labelling of equipment and storage – just don’t get too excited and label everything in sight!

Cathy Giles

Brother MFC-L8900CDW

The Brother MFC-L8900CDW is an absolute stand out. I struggle to fault it.

Luke Hill

MSI GT75 TITAN

I need power and lots of it. As a Front End Web developer anything less just won’t cut it which is why the MSI GT75 is an outstanding laptop for me. It’s a sleek and futuristic looking, high quality, beast that has a touch of sci-fi flare about it.

Emily Tyson

MSI GE63 Raider

If you’re looking to invest in your next work horse laptop for work or home use, you can’t go wrong with the MSI GE63.

Laura Johnston

MSI GS65 Stealth Thin

If you can afford the price tag, it is well worth the money. It out performs any other laptop I have tried for gaming, and the transportable design and incredible display also make it ideal for work.

Featured Content

Product Launch Showcase

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?