Want to buy a re-marked 3.6GHz Pentium 4 chip?

A Chinese electronics company is re-marking Celeron processors and then selling them over the Internet as Pentium 4 chips.

Shenzhen Chuanghui Electronics isn't shy about offering re-marked Intel processors for sale: the company is openly selling them through a major Chinese website and brags that its re-marked Pentium 4 chips look just like the real thing.

Re-marking is a process whereby a processor is relabeled to look like a chip that offers better performance and has a greater value. The problem of re-marked processors isn't a new one for the chip industry but it has become less prevalent in recent years, particularly in more developed markets where efforts to crack down on the sale of re-marked chips have been successful.

That's little comfort for Intel, which has been plagued recently by the appearance of re-marked Pentium M processors in China.

The chips, which were distributed as engineering samples to computer makers, were never meant to be sold to end users, according to the company.

But the problem of re-marked Intel chips in China is not confined to re-marked samples of the Pentium M. In Chuanghui's case, the company has set up virtual storefronts on at least two online marketplaces, including Alibaba.com's website, to sell re-marked Celeron processors to overseas buyers.

The Chuanghui storefronts describe the re-marked chips as Celeron processors that have been altered to pass as 3.6GHz Pentium 4 processors and assure prospective customers that they look just like the real thing.

Intel is not amused.

"That kind of behaviour is not something that we tolerate or endorse," a spokesperson for the chipmaker in Hong Kong, Barbara Grimes, said.

The re-marked processors that Chuanghui sells were actually 1.7GHz Celeron chips and are currently available for $US78 each, including a motherboard, in quantities of 100 or more, a company representative named online as a contact for potential buyers, James Zhan, said.

By comparison, Intel sells the real thing for $US401 in 1,000-unit quantities, without a motherboard, according to its most recent price list.

Passing off a Celeron as a Pentium 4 is not difficult to do as the two chips are based on the same basic design, according to a semiconductor executive in Taiwan familiar with the technical details of the two processors.

The main difference between the two chips was that most of the on-chip memory cache has been disabled in the Celerons, the executive said.

Chuanghui handleds the re-marking of the Celeron chips itself, Zhan said.

The company also provided buyers with software that masked the identify of the re-marked Celerons from a computer's BIOS and Microsoft's Windows XP operating system, fooling the software into believing the chip was actually a 3.6GHz Pentium 4 processor, he said.

Chuanghui began offering re-marked chips one year ago and now sells about 1000 of them every month, primarily to buyers in Asia and Africa, Zhan said.

Based in Shenzhen, just across the border from Hong Kong, Chuanghui was established in 1997 and manufactures a range of electronics products, including computer motherboards that are sold under the KingJet brand. The company employs a staff of 500, according to its website, which claims the company is an Intel partner.

Zhan defended Chuanghui's sale of re-marked chips.

He said, said the company didn't attempt to hide what had been done to the chips or to pass them off as a more valuable processor. "I tell them the truth," he said.

However, Zhan said Chuanghui has no control over how its customers represent the re-marked chips when they resell them.

Join the newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Rocket to Success - Your 10 Tips for Smarter ERP System Selection
Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Sumner Lemon

IDG News Service
Show Comments

Cool Tech

SanDisk MicroSDXC™ for Nintendo® Switch™

Learn more >

Breitling Superocean Heritage Chronographe 44

Learn more >

Toys for Boys

Family Friendly

Panasonic 4K UHD Blu-Ray Player and Full HD Recorder with Netflix - UBT1GL-K

Learn more >

Stocking Stuffer

Razer DeathAdder Expert Ergonomic Gaming Mouse

Learn more >

Christmas Gift Guide

Click for more ›

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Edwina Hargreaves

WD My Cloud Home

I would recommend this device for families and small businesses who want one safe place to store all their important digital content and a way to easily share it with friends, family, business partners, or customers.

Walid Mikhael

Brother QL-820NWB Professional Label Printer

It’s easy to set up, it’s compact and quiet when printing and to top if off, the print quality is excellent. This is hands down the best printer I’ve used for printing labels.

Ben Ramsden

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

Brainstorming, innovation, problem solving, and negotiation have all become much more productive and valuable if people can easily collaborate in real time with minimal friction.

Sarah Ieroianni

Brother QL-820NWB Professional Label Printer

The print quality also does not disappoint, it’s clear, bold, doesn’t smudge and the text is perfectly sized.

Ratchada Dunn

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The Huddle Board’s built in program; Sharp Touch Viewing software allows us to easily manipulate and edit our documents (jpegs and PDFs) all at the same time on the dashboard.

George Khoury

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The biggest perks for me would be that it comes with easy to use and comprehensive programs that make the collaboration process a whole lot more intuitive and organic

Featured Content

Product Launch Showcase

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?