Canon buys Toshiba stake in display JV to end lawsuit

Canon will buy Toshiba's stake in a JV they formed to develop large-screen flat-panel televisions, hoping to end a patent lawsuit against Canon in the U.S.

Canon will buy Toshiba's stake in a SED, a joint venture they formed to develop large-screen, low-power flat panel televisions. The companies hope the move will put an end to a patent lawsuit brought against Canon in the US.

SED will build televisions using Surface-conduction Electron-emitter Displays (SEDs). The displays generate light from the collision of electrons with a phosphor-coated screen, just like a conventional CRT television. However, SEDs are flatter and use less energy because the electrons are generated by thousands of individual emitters, one behind each phosphor dot on the screen, rather than by one giant electron gun at the back of the tube.

Canon began working with Toshiba on the commercialisation of SED technology in 1999, the same year that Nano-Proprietary, a patent-licensing company based in Austin, Texas, said it licensed technology to Canon for use in such displays.

Toshiba and Canon finally set up a joint venture, SED, in October 2004, to manufacture and sell the displays. Then in April 2005 Nano-Proprietary filed suit against Canon and its US subsidiary, claiming that SED was not covered by their licensing agreement, and was therefore not entitled to use the technology.

Nano-Proprietary has said it intends to see the case to trial: a court date has been set in March.

On the assumption that the technology would be the subject of prolonged litigation in the US, Toshiba agreed to sell its stake in the joint venture, Canon said.

The sale will close on January 29, and the joint venture's president, Kazunori Fukuma, will resign from Toshiba, where he is now employed, to join Canon on January. 30. Toshiba engineers seconded to the joint venture would also continue their work there for the time being, Canon said.

Despite the changes, Canon still expects television sets containing SEDs to go on sale in Japan in the fourth quarter, the company said.

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Peter Sayer

Peter Sayer

IDG News Service
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