Apple, Cisco make 'iPhone' peace, will share name

Cisco and Apple have settled their dispute over rights to use the iPhone name

Apple and Cisco Systems have agreed to share the "iPhone" name, putting an end to a dispute that threatened the June launch of Apple's highly-anticipated multimedia phone.

The deal ends a six-week legal trademark tussle that began Jan. 10, a day after Apple CEO Steve Jobs introduced his company's iPhone, when Cisco filed suit in a northern California federal court, claiming the name as its own via a 2000 acquisition. Cisco currently sells a line of Linksys VoIP devices under the iPhone label.

In a terse joint statement, Apple and Cisco said that they are both "free to use the 'iPhone' trademark on their products throughout the world." All pending legal action will be dismissed.

The two companies will also "explore opportunities for interoperability in the areas of security and consumer and enterprise communications." Earlier, Cisco had been pushing for an interoperability commitment.

With the agreement, Apple is free to use the iPhone label that Jobs unveiled at MacWorld Expo to fanfare and an instant 5 percent boost in the company's share price. If the feud had gone on, Apple might have been barred from using the name or launching the phone on time.

According to statements made by Cisco in January, it and Apple had been negotiating over the iPhone trademark for about two years, with talks dragging on even as Jobs stood on stage and demonstrated the new device in San Francisco. When Jobs used the iPhone moniker at MacWorld, Cisco brought out the lawyers. In return, Apple dismissed the Cisco lawsuit as "silly."

Other terms of the deal will remain confidential, the joint statement said.

Apple's iPhone is slated to go on sale in the U.S. in June, with two models priced at US$499 and $599. AT&T Inc. (formerly Cingular) will be the exclusive wireless carrier.

Join the newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Rocket to Success - Your 10 Tips for Smarter ERP System Selection
Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Gregg Keizer

Computerworld
Show Comments

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Ben Ramsden

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

Brainstorming, innovation, problem solving, and negotiation have all become much more productive and valuable if people can easily collaborate in real time with minimal friction.

Sarah Ieroianni

Brother QL-820NWB Professional Label Printer

The print quality also does not disappoint, it’s clear, bold, doesn’t smudge and the text is perfectly sized.

Ratchada Dunn

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The Huddle Board’s built in program; Sharp Touch Viewing software allows us to easily manipulate and edit our documents (jpegs and PDFs) all at the same time on the dashboard.

George Khoury

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The biggest perks for me would be that it comes with easy to use and comprehensive programs that make the collaboration process a whole lot more intuitive and organic

David Coyle

Brother PocketJet PJ-773 A4 Portable Thermal Printer

I rate the printer as a 5 out of 5 stars as it has been able to fit seamlessly into my busy and mobile lifestyle.

Kurt Hegetschweiler

Brother PocketJet PJ-773 A4 Portable Thermal Printer

It’s perfect for mobile workers. Just take it out — it’s small enough to sit anywhere — turn it on, load a sheet of paper, and start printing.

Featured Content

Product Launch Showcase

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?