Youth finds its own way to make IT productive

Don't trust anyone over 30

If you're old enough to remember the "generation gap" of the 1960s and 1970s, then it's likely you're now part of the "establishment" that manages the use of personal computing in business.

Young Baby Boomers growing up back then recall the generation gap as the distance between themselves and their parents, perceived as people unable to relate to or understand their interests, desires and passions. It was a chasm of misunderstanding and intransigence that existed between young and old.

Perhaps many of today's generation new to the workplace feel misunderstood by the older business IT "establishment." The one side seems obsessed with tight control of personal computing in business while a new and seemingly rebellious workforce is apt to ignore corporate mandates and customize their computing experiences.

They're two generations from different eras. To Baby Boomers, IT was a concept introduced during their early and mid adult years. Their computing skills were honed on the job by corporate and IT leadership, which saw technology as something that needed to be controlled and limited.

Today's community of younger workers, exposed since childhood to personal computing and the Internet, learned the art of computing at home and at school. Many enter the work place as savvy and experienced. They seek to explore and experiment with IT and are apt to have better computing skills than the old-time IT managers who support them.

One group is generally resistant to the increasing use of technology, while the other fully embraces the concept. They think differently.

If businesses aren't already grappling with the IT generation gap, then it's likely they will in the near future. How might a business look to understand what a new generation of employees requires and expects in the way of IT resources? How does the IT department understand how this next generation of employees seeks to use computing in order to be productive and efficient?

These questions came to mind at an IT World Canada CIO Frankly Speaking breakfast last month, intended to examine the business value of integrated communications. A great deal of time was spent discussing the use of instant messaging and email - the comfortable communication tools of a new generation.

Kevin Salvadori, CIO for Telus, observed that email and instant messaging had a useful place in business communications and is, in fact, a preferred choice for the vast majority of younger employees.

Curiously, however, none of the 44 CIOs and senior IT professionals in attendance - the vast majority of whom were definitely among the 40-plus crowd - said their companies sanctioned the use of instant messaging. Both instant messaging and email were generally considered intrusive and counter-productive, and were discouraged.

One CIO argued that email and instant messaging actually reduced employee productivity because of the constant interruptions created by these forms of communication.

Mr. Salvadori agreed that messaging for business communications required intelligent use. But he insisted that text messaging was an important application, particularly for ongoing information retrieval in a scattered organization. He went further, suggesting that today's younger generation of business employees had figured out how to be highly productive by using various types of communication and messaging, and had learned to be effective multi-tasking employees.

"If you want to force people who are 20 to 30 (years old) to communicate in a different style, it's going to have an impact on their productivity," he told the assembled audience. Mr. Salvadori added it's likely that many employees will simply use online messaging despite company mandates that might prohibit it.

"Just because you haven't sanctioned [instant messaging], don't think it's not happening or being used in your organization," he said.

Join the newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Rocket to Success - Your 10 Tips for Smarter ERP System Selection
Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Dan McLean

PCworld.ca
Show Comments

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Ben Ramsden

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

Brainstorming, innovation, problem solving, and negotiation have all become much more productive and valuable if people can easily collaborate in real time with minimal friction.

Sarah Ieroianni

Brother QL-820NWB Professional Label Printer

The print quality also does not disappoint, it’s clear, bold, doesn’t smudge and the text is perfectly sized.

Ratchada Dunn

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The Huddle Board’s built in program; Sharp Touch Viewing software allows us to easily manipulate and edit our documents (jpegs and PDFs) all at the same time on the dashboard.

George Khoury

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The biggest perks for me would be that it comes with easy to use and comprehensive programs that make the collaboration process a whole lot more intuitive and organic

David Coyle

Brother PocketJet PJ-773 A4 Portable Thermal Printer

I rate the printer as a 5 out of 5 stars as it has been able to fit seamlessly into my busy and mobile lifestyle.

Kurt Hegetschweiler

Brother PocketJet PJ-773 A4 Portable Thermal Printer

It’s perfect for mobile workers. Just take it out — it’s small enough to sit anywhere — turn it on, load a sheet of paper, and start printing.

Featured Content

Product Launch Showcase

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?