Greenpeace slams Nokia, Nintendo in electronics guide

Greenpeace released its latest ranking of electronics companies based on their environmental efforts.

Nokia fell from first place to ninth and Nintendo placed last in the latest guide to green electronics from Greenpeace.

Nokia's ranking dropped mainly because Greenpeace says the company fails to support its stated recycling program. A Greenpeace video shows a mobile user entering a shop in Argentina that Nokia referred the user to in order to recycle an old phone. The shopkeeper says she doesn't take back used phones and doesn't know where to refer the person to do so.

Greenpeace found similar situations in the Philippines, Thailand, Russia and India, where Nokia staff didn't know about Nokia's take-back program and often provided misleading information. In Thailand, Russia and Argentina, information about the service wasn't available in the local language.

Greenpeace awards scores to companies on the list based on many factors including recycling programs and toxic substances used in products.

Motorola also fell in the ranking for similar reasons as Nokia. Greenpeace found that Motorola staff in the Philippines, Thailand and India were poorly informed about the company's phone take-back program. Also, Motorola doesn't have a take-back service in Russia, Greenpeace said.

For the first time Greenpeace included gaming consoles on the list. Nintendo became the first company to score a zero for having no environmental credentials at all. Microsoft received a score of 2.7, with points for chemical management but not much else.

Apple moved up one position in the ranking to 11th for a decrease in the use of certain toxic chemicals in iMacs and iPods. The company would do better if it improved the reach of its take-back programs and posted its banned substance list on its Web site, Greenpeace said.

Sony Ericsson took the top spot in the report, with a score of 7.7 out of 10. The company has improved its reporting of recycled phones and set a timeline for the elimination of some chemicals, Greenpeace found.

Samsung came in second place and Sony, third. Both companies did well in reducing toxic chemicals, Greenpeace said.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Nancy Gohring

IDG News Service
Show Comments

Brand Post

Imou: At home with security

Modern living is all about functionality and security for everybody from the very young to the very old. With Imou anybody can enjoy smart life – the solution is at their fingertips.

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Tom Pope

Dynabook Portégé X30L-G

Ultimately this laptop has achieved everything I would hope for in a laptop for work, while fitting that into a form factor and weight that is remarkable.

Tom Sellers

MSI P65

This smart laptop was enjoyable to use and great to work on – creating content was super simple.

Lolita Wang

MSI GT76

It really doesn’t get more “gaming laptop” than this.

Jack Jeffries

MSI GS75

As the Maserati or BMW of laptops, it would fit perfectly in the hands of a professional needing firepower under the hood, sophistication and class on the surface, and gaming prowess (sports mode if you will) in between.

Taylor Carr

MSI PS63

The MSI PS63 is an amazing laptop and I would definitely consider buying one in the future.

Christopher Low

Brother RJ-4230B

This small mobile printer is exactly what I need for invoicing and other jobs such as sending fellow tradesman details or step-by-step instructions that I can easily print off from my phone or the Web.

Featured Content

Product Launch Showcase

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?