More quick fixes for common Windows annoyances

Dump the Insert key, rearrange drive letters, restore your Safely Remove Hardware icon, and get a free tool for easy Registry editing.

If you've got a multislot media card reader, chances are you face a mess of drive letters every time you double-click My Computer. I've finally outsmarted the Redmond kids in my battle with the dumb way Windows handles drive letters--and in this column I give you the fix. Plus, I share an easy way to restore the fickle Safely Remove Hardware icon to your system tray, and a trick to combat Insertus idioticus--by disabling the Insert key.

Disable unused drive letters

The Hassle: My PC has a built-in memory card reader, and the only slots I use are for CompactFlash and SD cards. Yet when I try to find the card I've just inserted in Windows Explorer, I always seem to click the drive letter of an empty slot. Do you have a fix?

The Fix: First, let's start by eliminating the card reader drive letters you don't use. Log in as Administrator, open Windows Explorer, and insert your memory cards into the card reader slots. Jot down the corresponding drive letters and, using the Safely Remove Hardware icon in the System tray, remove the memory cards.

From the Start menu, run diskmgmt.msc. Under Disk Management, you'll see all your drives. Find the unused drives in the lower panel--they're listed with a drive letter, a disk number, and a 'No Media' designation. Right-click, select Change Drive Letter and Paths, click Remove, click Yes, and say adios. Cool, no?

My preference is to push the drive letters of the remaining memory cards near the end of the alphabet--and to use mnemonics for easier recall. I use drive letter "W" for the wide CompactFlash card and "S" for the smaller SD card. (I've also assigned mapped network drives to Y and Z.)

From that same spot in the Disk Management applet, right-click, choose Change, and pick a letter from the end of the alphabet.

This reassignment trick also keeps the drive letters of my temporary USB devices--two hard drives, an MP3 player and flash drive, and a GPS unit--all neatly stacked just after my last fixed drive.

Restore the safely remove hardware icon

The Hassle: Where's my Safely Remove Hardware icon? One day it's here, the next day it's missing from the system tray!

The Fix: The icon is probably just hidden. Right-click Start, select Properties, choose the Taskbar tab, click Customize, scroll to Safely Remove Hardware, and make the behavior Always Show. Alternatively you can keep the icon hidden (and your Systray uncluttered) and force it to appear when you need it by creating a desktop shortcut. Right-click your desktop, choose New, Shortcut, insert the line C:\WINDOWS\system32\rundll32.exe shell32.dll,Control_RunDLL hotplug.dll in the 'Type the location of the item:' field, and click Next. Rename the shortcut USB Remove.

Join the newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Rocket to Success - Your 10 Tips for Smarter ERP System Selection
Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Steve Bass

PC World
Show Comments

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Ben Ramsden

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

Brainstorming, innovation, problem solving, and negotiation have all become much more productive and valuable if people can easily collaborate in real time with minimal friction.

Sarah Ieroianni

Brother QL-820NWB Professional Label Printer

The print quality also does not disappoint, it’s clear, bold, doesn’t smudge and the text is perfectly sized.

Ratchada Dunn

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The Huddle Board’s built in program; Sharp Touch Viewing software allows us to easily manipulate and edit our documents (jpegs and PDFs) all at the same time on the dashboard.

George Khoury

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The biggest perks for me would be that it comes with easy to use and comprehensive programs that make the collaboration process a whole lot more intuitive and organic

David Coyle

Brother PocketJet PJ-773 A4 Portable Thermal Printer

I rate the printer as a 5 out of 5 stars as it has been able to fit seamlessly into my busy and mobile lifestyle.

Kurt Hegetschweiler

Brother PocketJet PJ-773 A4 Portable Thermal Printer

It’s perfect for mobile workers. Just take it out — it’s small enough to sit anywhere — turn it on, load a sheet of paper, and start printing.

Featured Content

Product Launch Showcase

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?