Jitterbit reveals open-source data integration tool

Jitterbit is one of a growing set of open-source data integration tools now in the market.

Data-integration vendor Jitterbit released the 2.0 version of its platform on Monday, adding another entry to a growing group of open-source alternatives to proprietary offerings from the likes of IBM, SAS and Informatica.

Jitterbit provides a set of connectors to major enterprise applications and databases but also runs a marketplace where customers can buy and sell completed integrations.

The marketplace site underscores a key value of applying the open-source model to data integration, said CEO Sharam Sasson. "The biggest challenge in integrating data is not just mapping bits and bytes, but really understanding these systems," he said. "That domain expertise, we don't have. It's in the heads of the community."

Jitterbit makes its money on support; a typical deal is in the US$20,000-per-year range, company officials said.

For the 2.0 release, Jitterbit placed particular emphasis on the user interface, creating a new visual, drag-and-drop workflow designer for creating and testing integrations.

The 2.0 release also introduces parallel processing for moving larger amounts of data. For example, an IT shop might want to load 100,000 leads into Salesforce.com from a campaign management system, but Salesforce places a limit on the number of records that can be delivered in a single transmission, according to CTO Ilan Sehayek.

Jitterbit can now "chunk" the data into multiple concurrent calls. "Salesforce can handle many calls, it just doesn't want them to be large," Sehayek said.

Other open-source data integration vendors include Talend, XAware and SnapLogic, which also has a community site and is building a library of completed connectors and pipelines.

"The integration problem is a really terrific candidate for open source, not only from the development side but the business perspective," said SnapLogic CEO Chris Marino. That's because data integration today requires connectivity with a wide range of sources, and it is too expensive to rely on a vendor or integrator to provide every connection, he said.

SnapLogic offers a free community edition under the GPL v2 open-source license, as well as commercial versions. But it is not attempting to compete with major proprietary players like Informatica, which was co-founded by SnapLogic's chairman Gaurav Dhillon, he said.

Informatica makes software that has "been tuned mightily to move vast amounts of data, to do all the things people need to do to build data warehouses for [business intelligence]," Marino said. SnapLogic has instead "focused on the problem of integrating on the Web."

To that end, these vendors don't necessarily pose an immediate threat to established players, but are finding a niche, according to one industry observer.

"I see a lot more open source data integration vendors than customers today, but do believe these tools can offer add value for certain types of customers," said Rob Karel, an analyst with Forrester Research, via e-mail.

The tools are best suited for "midmarket companies with less complex requirements and smaller budgets, or departmental or project-based initiatives within larger enterprises," he said.

NASA's Integrated Services Environment (NISE) is using Jitterbit to handle data integration needs in its identity management infrastructure, pushing information from sources like human resources systems to enterprise directories, said project manager Sharon Ing. "It's all about ID management and provisioning of credentials."

Ing's group manages about 150,000 identities. Officials tested systems from large vendors before settling on Jitterbit, she said.

The tool is easy to use -- albeit for technically savvy people -- and its "cost was certainly attractive to us," she said.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Chris Kanaracus

IDG News Service
Show Comments

Father’s Day Gift Guide

Brand Post

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Luke Hill

MSI GT75 TITAN

I need power and lots of it. As a Front End Web developer anything less just won’t cut it which is why the MSI GT75 is an outstanding laptop for me. It’s a sleek and futuristic looking, high quality, beast that has a touch of sci-fi flare about it.

Emily Tyson

MSI GE63 Raider

If you’re looking to invest in your next work horse laptop for work or home use, you can’t go wrong with the MSI GE63.

Laura Johnston

MSI GS65 Stealth Thin

If you can afford the price tag, it is well worth the money. It out performs any other laptop I have tried for gaming, and the transportable design and incredible display also make it ideal for work.

Andrew Teoh

Brother MFC-L9570CDW Multifunction Printer

Touch screen visibility and operation was great and easy to navigate. Each menu and sub-menu was in an understandable order and category

Louise Coady

Brother MFC-L9570CDW Multifunction Printer

The printer was convenient, produced clear and vibrant images and was very easy to use

Edwina Hargreaves

WD My Cloud Home

I would recommend this device for families and small businesses who want one safe place to store all their important digital content and a way to easily share it with friends, family, business partners, or customers.

Featured Content

Product Launch Showcase

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?