Chinese team mistakenly released unpatched IE7 exploit

Internet Explorer 7 flaw means a computer could be infected with malicious software merely by visiting a Web site.

Chinese security researchers mistakenly released the code needed to hack a PC by exploiting an unpatched vulnerability in Microsoft's Internet Explorer 7 browser, potentially putting millions of computer users at risk -- but it appears some hackers already knew how to exploit the flaw.

At one point, the code was traded for as much as US$15,000 on the underground criminal markets, according to iDefense, the computer security branch of VeriSign, citing a blog post from the Chinese team.

The problem in Internet Explorer 7 means a computer could be infected with malicious software merely by visiting a Web site, one of the most dangerous computer security scenarios. It affects computers running IE7 on Windows XP regardless of the service pack version, Windows Server 2003 running Service Pack 1 or 2, Windows Vista and Windows Vista with Service Pack 1 as well as Windows Server 2008.

Microsoft has acknowledged the issue but not indicated when it will release a patch.

The vulnerability was first revealed earlier this week by the Chinese security team "knownsec." Knownsec said on Tuesday they mistakenly released exploit code thinking that the problem was already patched, iDefense said.

"This is our mistake," knownsec said in a Chinese-language research note.

That mistake could mean that more hackers will try to build Web sites in order to compromise users PCs since the exploit code is more freely floating around on the Internet. However, other information indicates that hackers already knew how it worked before the release. According to knownsec, a rumor surfaced earlier in the year about a bug in Internet Explorer, iDefense wrote.

Information on the vulnerability was allegedly sold in November on the underground back market for US$15,000. Earlier this month, the exploit was sold second or third hand for US$650, said iDefense, citing knownsec.

Eventually, someone developed a Trojan horse program -- one that appears harmless but is actually malicious -- that is designed to steal information related to Chinese-language PC games, a popular target for hackers.

Now, other Web sites are being built that incorporate the exploit. Hackers then usually try to get people to visit those sites through spam or unsolicited instant messages. The Shadowserver Foundation has published a list of domains that are hosting the exploit and subsequent Trojan, although users are highly advised not to visit the Web sites. Most are ".cn" domains, the top-level domain for China.

Researchers are also seeing hackers incorporate the IE7 exploit into Web sites that have been compromised by the so-called SQL injection attacks.

Those Web sites, due to security problems, have been hacked and then rigged to pull content from other harmful Web sites in a window called an iframe, said Carl Leonard, Websense's threat research manager for Europe. Using JavaScript, the iframe automatically redirects users to a malware-infested site that tries to infect the PC.

Hundreds of thousands of Web sites were affected earlier this year; a huge number of those sites still have not been fixed, Leonard said. The sites serve up exploits for vulnerabilities that have been patched.

But the IE7 vulnerability is especially dangerous since there's no patch. It means a user could visit, for example, a Web site run by a local government and end up infected.

Those dangers could prompt Microsoft to move faster to make a patch. Patches, however, take a lot of engineering effort to ensure they don't bungle up other applications. In the meantime, hackers can expand their reach to infect as many PCs as possible.

"I'll probably say with the key browser being vulnerable that Microsoft will probably have to do something before the next patch Tuesday," Leonard said.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags internet explorer 7

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Jeremy Kirk

IDG News Service
Show Comments

Brand Post

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Tom Pope

Dynabook Portégé X30L-G

Ultimately this laptop has achieved everything I would hope for in a laptop for work, while fitting that into a form factor and weight that is remarkable.

Tom Sellers

MSI P65

This smart laptop was enjoyable to use and great to work on – creating content was super simple.

Lolita Wang

MSI GT76

It really doesn’t get more “gaming laptop” than this.

Jack Jeffries

MSI GS75

As the Maserati or BMW of laptops, it would fit perfectly in the hands of a professional needing firepower under the hood, sophistication and class on the surface, and gaming prowess (sports mode if you will) in between.

Taylor Carr

MSI PS63

The MSI PS63 is an amazing laptop and I would definitely consider buying one in the future.

Christopher Low

Brother RJ-4230B

This small mobile printer is exactly what I need for invoicing and other jobs such as sending fellow tradesman details or step-by-step instructions that I can easily print off from my phone or the Web.

Featured Content

Product Launch Showcase

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?