OpenCL technology may speed up 'Snow Leopard'

The technology allows developers to tap into the latent power of graphics chips

A recently-approved technology standard should help software developers to tap the latent processing power of graphics chips and transform regular computers into veritable supercomputers -- at least for certain applications. Poised to take advantage of the technology first is Apple.

Based on the popular C programming language, version 1.0 of OpenCL was ratified and published by standards body The Khronos Group last week. The OpenCL programming language developed by Apple lets applications offload much of the processing from the CPUs to a computer's graphics chip, or GPU.

Modern GPUs from Nvidia, AMD subsidiary ATI and Intel are as powerful as regular CPUs -- in some cases more so. For instance, ATI's latest Radeon HD 4870 GPU has almost 1 billion transistors, more than twice as many transistors as parent AMD's most powerful quad-core Phenom CPU.

Even when they are helping to display hyper-realistic first-person shooter video games or encoding video, GPUs tend to be woefully underutilized. OpenCL can solve that by allowing GPUs to acclerate many applications, especially those whose work can be broken down into many smaller parallel calculations, such as low-level number crunching, high-resolution graphics rendering and video encoding.

For those operations, GPUs "are blindingly fast," said Dan Olds, an analyst with the Gabriel Consulting Group. Encoding and rendering high-def video can be done between 40 to 100 times faster when apps are recompiled with OpenCL, said Olds. Health-care applications such as those processing MRIs and CAT scans would see similar acceleration, he said.

"When you compare the performance to a standard Mac, this will sound like a supercomputer to some people," he said.

Ian Lao, an analyst with In-Stat Inc., agreed. "This is not total hyperbole," he said. "The moment I enable OpenCL, I can take a desktop computer into the low-to-mid-end server/supercomputer category."

Apple the immediate beneficiary

Apple looks to be the chief immediate beneficiary of OpenCL, which will be supported in its forthcoming move to Mac OS X 10.6, codenamed "Snow Leopard."

"That hides some of the complexity of OpenCL, such as the need for OS X to detect and download separate graphics drivers," said Lao, though he noted that Macs will still need specific Nvidia or ATI graphics chips to take advantage of the technology.

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Eric Lai

Computerworld
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