IBM releases combined digital notepad and notebook

The IBM TransNote will go on sale with a starting price of $6499. It will feature an Intel Pentium III 600-MHz processor, a 10.4-inch TFT screen, and a 10GB hard drive. It should be shipped Australia-wide within the coming weeks.

What makes the TransNote unique is the other half of the system that is connected to a digital notepad dubbed the ThinkScribe by IBM.

The ThinkScribe allows a user to write using an ink-filled digital pen. Any type of paper sits atop an electronic grid array that senses and captures the pen movements and uses an RF transmitter to send the saved file to the notebook. The TransScribe captures the pen strokes as a graphics file and has 2MB of flash memory, which can store about 50 pages of handwritten notes. Although in a graphics file, notes can be searched by keyword, date, and subject matter, among other parameters.

The TransNote was developed as a direct result of customer research according to Leo Suarez, director of worldwide product marketing for IBM Mobile Systems.

According to Suarez research indicated that some users were frustrated over the need to constantly switch between pen and paper and a computer.

"Lawyers in a court room is one example. Now they can send notes wirelessly directly to their secretary," Suarez said. He also pointed to the health care and insurance industries where the ability to switch between pen and paper and computer would be helpful.

The device with the computer on the left and the notepad on the right, (or vice versa for left-handed users) folds into what appears to be a 12.6-inch-by-11-inch-by-1.3-inch-thick traditional notebook. The entire unit weighs approximately 2.5kg, including pen and a paper pad.

Once opened the screen slides up into a vertical position and locks while the ThinkScribe side remains flat.

"This is like a concept car product that demonstrates leadership and innovation," said Gerry Purdy, president of Mobile Insights.

According to Suarez, it was a simple step to combine electronic inking and capture technology from IBM's Watson Research centre in the US and notebook technology from its ThinkPad division.

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Ephraim Schwartz

PC World
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