Apple 'no refunds' policy for better and worse

Apple's "no refunds" policy for iPhone App Store purchase is both not as bad--and worse--than it sounds. Readers say Apple occasionally gives refunds, but also complain that Apple's own updates break apps for which no refunds are given.

Apple's "no refunds" policy for iPhone App Store purchase is both not as bad--and worse--than it sounds. Readers say Apple occasionally gives refunds, but also complain that Apple's own updates break apps for which no refunds are given.

These readers were replying to a story about the no-refunds policy I posted earlier today.

One reader said he got a refund for applications purchased that did not function with VoiceOver, an accessibility application used by the visually disabled.

"I sent a long and stern letter detailing the inadequacies of the app store for the blind community and how it was clearly unjust to force people to pay for applications that are completely unusable on their devices," the reader wrote in an e-mail.

"The result? Somewhat surprisingly, they promptly refunded the price of all the applications I had listed without any trouble at all. Clearly, their draconian refund policy is not set in stone and they are willing to consider requests on a case-by-case basis at least some of the time."

Another reader warned that sometimes Apple itself is to blame for non-functional apps, but offers no help in those cases.

"A problem that was not mentioned is that every time Apple updates firmware, as in v3.0 upgrade, an app can be broken," the reader wrote.

"A year ago, I bought a language app for $US25. Today it is not working properly because of the update and Apple would not refund my money. The developer says they sent an update but Apple has not approved it.

"So, Apple can, at their discretion, keep an app from working properly and keep the money."

Still another reader says, "don't worry" because now that the refund issue has made the New York Times, lawyers will doubtless soon come to the rescue.

"Sounds like a bonanza for a class action lawyer," the reader wrote.

"The implied warrantee of fitness/merchantability means Apple is breaking the law when it does not refund the price on apps that don't work. This is not something Apple's lawyers can defend against!"

"The end result usually is that there is a large settlement; a huge percentage goes to the lawyers, and since "individual compensation is too cumbersome," the rest is sent to some charity," according to the reader.

David Coursey tweets as @techinciter and can be contacted via his Web site.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags AppleiPhoneiphone appsiphone app storemobile apps

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

David Coursey

PC World (US online)
Show Comments

Brand Post

Shining a light on creativity

MSI has long pushed the boundaries of invention with its ever-evolving range of laptops but it has now pulled off a world first with the new MSI Creative 17.

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Tom Pope

Dynabook Portégé X30L-G

Ultimately this laptop has achieved everything I would hope for in a laptop for work, while fitting that into a form factor and weight that is remarkable.

Tom Sellers

MSI P65

This smart laptop was enjoyable to use and great to work on – creating content was super simple.

Lolita Wang

MSI GT76

It really doesn’t get more “gaming laptop” than this.

Jack Jeffries

MSI GS75

As the Maserati or BMW of laptops, it would fit perfectly in the hands of a professional needing firepower under the hood, sophistication and class on the surface, and gaming prowess (sports mode if you will) in between.

Taylor Carr

MSI PS63

The MSI PS63 is an amazing laptop and I would definitely consider buying one in the future.

Christopher Low

Brother RJ-4230B

This small mobile printer is exactly what I need for invoicing and other jobs such as sending fellow tradesman details or step-by-step instructions that I can easily print off from my phone or the Web.

Featured Content

Product Launch Showcase

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?