Intel gets ready to launch 32nm Westmere chips

Jumping from 45nm to 32nm, Intel will unveil three new chips at CES this week

Intel Corp. is making a big leap later this week, moving from a 45-nanometer manufacturing process to 32nm with three new chips.

Intel is expected to announce the new chips - and their associated chipsets - at the International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. Billing Intel President Paul Otellini's Thursday keynote as a big news event, the company is set to unveil three chips from the Westmere family for desktop and mobile PCs.

While Westmere has been the chips' internal name, they're officially being called Core i3, Core i5 and Core i7. The chips all are based on the Nehalem architecture but are being built on a 32nm platform. Rival Advanced Micro Devices Inc. is scheduled to release its first 32nm chip in six months or so, but this is the first time Intel has dropped below 45nm , and the move marks a significant milestone for the industry.

"This is a big deal because these are the first 32nm chips, which is a big shrink versus current 45nm technology," said Dan Olds, an analyst with the Gabriel Consulting Group. "AMD is supposed to deliver 32nm chips in 2010, sometime around mid-year. Intel has supposedly been fabbing these new chips since November to ensure an adequate supply, meaning that Intel will be in the driver's seat at least until mid-2010, though it could be longer if AMD's production schedules slip. For their part, AMD needs to get its 32nm technology out on time -- or sooner if possible. The longer Intel has the lead, the more difficult it will be for AMD to regain mind and market share."

With the big Otellini keynote coming later this week, Intel released some basic information about the new chips today.

According to Intel, all three new chips will be dual cores and will use hyper-threading technology, an integrated memory controller and intelligent power gating.

Jim McGregor, an analyst with In-Stat, noted that the 32nm chips will have an increased transistor count , and the chips will run faster without increasing power consumption. Intel is able to squeeze so much more on the new chips that the corresponding chipset packages, which are the groups of chips designed to work together, has gone from three to two chips.

"With this shrink, Intel is able to pull more circuitry onto the chip, such as the memory and graphics controllers," Olds said. "This allows them to eliminate an entire chip, making their processor/chipset solution two chips rather than three. This is important as it is less costly to manufacture and will reduce costs to OEMs. In turn, this also means that the chips take up less space on the board and will allow smaller and more flexible system form factors. Intel being able to fab these chips in volume puts them firmly in the lead over AMD."

This week's news also means that Intel is keeping up with Moore's Law , the 42-year-old prediction by Gordon Moore holds that the number of transistors on a chip doubles about every two years. However, some observers have predicted over the years that leakage and energy consumption are going to be significant roadblocks to the law continuing to hold true.

Intel, so far, is staying the course. The chip maker moved from a 65nm manufacturing process to 45nm about two years ago, and this week marks the jump down to 32nm.

"This is the next major process step," McGregor said. "Basically, it gets down to the economics of the industry - shrinking dies, adding transistors, doing more with fewer resources. This is what it's all about in this industry."

McGregor also noted that this is a critical move, and not just for the PC and laptop industry. The work Intel has been doing on Westmere will help the company develop 32nm Atom chips for netbooks and pocket devices in the near future.

"This is important for the PC, but these small-design geometries are critical for netbooks and smartphones," he added. "That's where the most bang for the buck is going to be for 32nm."

Sharon Gaudin covers Internet and Web 2.0, emerging technologies and desktop/laptop chips for Computerworld . Follow Sharon on Twitter @sgaudin.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags intelWestmereces 2010

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Sharon Gaudin

Computerworld (US)
Show Comments

Brand Post

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Luke Hill

MSI GT75 TITAN

I need power and lots of it. As a Front End Web developer anything less just won’t cut it which is why the MSI GT75 is an outstanding laptop for me. It’s a sleek and futuristic looking, high quality, beast that has a touch of sci-fi flare about it.

Emily Tyson

MSI GE63 Raider

If you’re looking to invest in your next work horse laptop for work or home use, you can’t go wrong with the MSI GE63.

Laura Johnston

MSI GS65 Stealth Thin

If you can afford the price tag, it is well worth the money. It out performs any other laptop I have tried for gaming, and the transportable design and incredible display also make it ideal for work.

Andrew Teoh

Brother MFC-L9570CDW Multifunction Printer

Touch screen visibility and operation was great and easy to navigate. Each menu and sub-menu was in an understandable order and category

Louise Coady

Brother MFC-L9570CDW Multifunction Printer

The printer was convenient, produced clear and vibrant images and was very easy to use

Edwina Hargreaves

WD My Cloud Home

I would recommend this device for families and small businesses who want one safe place to store all their important digital content and a way to easily share it with friends, family, business partners, or customers.

Featured Content

Product Launch Showcase

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?