Suing states want unbundled Windows

The nine states that did not join the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) in settling the antitrust case with Microsoft Corp. plan to propose a set of remedies to the federal judge overseeing the case on Friday.

Attorneys general from these states are tentatively planning to hold a press conference mid-afternoon on Friday to discuss the proposed remedies, according to sources. The proposal must be filed with U.S. District Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly by 4:30 p.m. ET on Friday, the sources said.

While press reports have described different remedies under consideration, it appears that the states' proposal is still in flux. The discussion among the states regarding remedies is ongoing, said one source who asked for anonymity and who is an official at the attorney general's office of one of the suing states. Another source who also didn't want to be named said that the states on Thursday are asking for input from industry experts regarding the proposal, which could alter the draft remedies that already have been crafted.

According to published reports, lawyers representing attorneys general from the nine holdout states -- California, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Iowa, Florida, Kansas, Minnesota, West Virginia, and Utah, plus the District of Columbia -- met on Wednesday to hammer out a remedy proposal that includes tougher enforcement sanctions and that closes a number of what these states consider loopholes in the DOJ's settlement agreement with Microsoft, which nine other states did agree to last month.

This remedy proposal would force Microsoft to offer to both computer makers and consumers the option of buying Windows without bundled applications, such as a browser or media player, according to an article in the New York Times.

According to a Reuters report, demanding a cheaper, stripped-down version of Windows is one of the possibilities the nine states are considering. Also under consideration is a requirement that Microsoft must include support for Sun Microsystems Inc.'s Java programming language in Windows XP, the report said.

Microsoft will respond to the states' Friday filing by Dec. 12.

Meanwhile, a collection of consumer advocate groups on Wednesday cheered the holdout states while denouncing the proposed settlement that Microsoft, the DOJ, and nine other states agreed to.

Join the newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Rocket to Success - Your 10 Tips for Smarter ERP System Selection
Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.
Show Comments

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Ben Ramsden

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

Brainstorming, innovation, problem solving, and negotiation have all become much more productive and valuable if people can easily collaborate in real time with minimal friction.

Sarah Ieroianni

Brother QL-820NWB Professional Label Printer

The print quality also does not disappoint, it’s clear, bold, doesn’t smudge and the text is perfectly sized.

Ratchada Dunn

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The Huddle Board’s built in program; Sharp Touch Viewing software allows us to easily manipulate and edit our documents (jpegs and PDFs) all at the same time on the dashboard.

George Khoury

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The biggest perks for me would be that it comes with easy to use and comprehensive programs that make the collaboration process a whole lot more intuitive and organic

David Coyle

Brother PocketJet PJ-773 A4 Portable Thermal Printer

I rate the printer as a 5 out of 5 stars as it has been able to fit seamlessly into my busy and mobile lifestyle.

Kurt Hegetschweiler

Brother PocketJet PJ-773 A4 Portable Thermal Printer

It’s perfect for mobile workers. Just take it out — it’s small enough to sit anywhere — turn it on, load a sheet of paper, and start printing.

Featured Content

Product Launch Showcase

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?