Oracle pledges support for OpenOffice.org

The announcement comes after speculation and worry among the OpenOffice community

Oracle sought to dispel any doubts about its commitment to OpenOffice.org on Wednesday, announcing its participation in the ODF Plugfest event in Brussels this week and talking up future development plans for the open source productivity suite.

Programmers and testers at the vendor "will continue developing, improving, and supporting OpenOffice.org as open source, building on the 7.5 million lines of code already contributed to the community," Oracle said in a statement. The company welcomes community contributions to the code base, it adds.

Oracle's announcement follows last month's move by some OpenOffice.org contributors to create an offshoot version of the suite under the name LibreOffice.

The group also formed a new organization called the Document Foundation, which released a "Next Decade Manifesto" on Wednesday. It lays out the group's philosophical principles, which include the rejection of "office productivity tools by monopoly suppliers" and the embrace of "an open and transparent peer-reviewed software development process where technical excellence is valued."

LibreOffice has support from a number of major vendors, including Google, Red Hat and Novell.

Last week, the group said a beta of LibreOffice had been downloaded more than 80,000 times and code contributions had already been made.

The group has said it has no intentions of creating a commercial product based on LibreOffice, although nothing stands in the way of vendors doing so.

Oracle itself sells Oracle OpenOffice, a product based on the OpenOffice.org code base that bundles in additional tools and extensions, including a Microsoft SharePoint connector.

The Document Foundation, which could not immediately be reached for comment Wednesday, has invited Oracle to join the organization and donate the OpenOffice.org brand name. An Oracle spokeswoman declined to comment on the status of that request.

Chris Kanaracus covers enterprise software and general technology breaking news for The IDG News Service. Chris's e-mail address is Chris_Kanaracus@idg.com

Join the newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Rocket to Success - Your 10 Tips for Smarter ERP System Selection

Tags business issuesopen sourceMergers / acquisitionsapplicationsSun MicrosystemssoftwarecollaborationOracle

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Chris Kanaracus

IDG News Service
Show Comments

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Ben Ramsden

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

Brainstorming, innovation, problem solving, and negotiation have all become much more productive and valuable if people can easily collaborate in real time with minimal friction.

Sarah Ieroianni

Brother QL-820NWB Professional Label Printer

The print quality also does not disappoint, it’s clear, bold, doesn’t smudge and the text is perfectly sized.

Ratchada Dunn

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The Huddle Board’s built in program; Sharp Touch Viewing software allows us to easily manipulate and edit our documents (jpegs and PDFs) all at the same time on the dashboard.

George Khoury

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The biggest perks for me would be that it comes with easy to use and comprehensive programs that make the collaboration process a whole lot more intuitive and organic

David Coyle

Brother PocketJet PJ-773 A4 Portable Thermal Printer

I rate the printer as a 5 out of 5 stars as it has been able to fit seamlessly into my busy and mobile lifestyle.

Kurt Hegetschweiler

Brother PocketJet PJ-773 A4 Portable Thermal Printer

It’s perfect for mobile workers. Just take it out — it’s small enough to sit anywhere — turn it on, load a sheet of paper, and start printing.

Featured Content

Product Launch Showcase

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?