Anonymous attacks Turkish websites again

The group is protesting against proposed Internet filters in Turkey

Hacker group Anonymous said late Wednesday that its Antisec movement hacked and defaced Turkish government websites, in protest against new Internet filtering rules that come into force in the country in August.

The group said it released data from about 100 websites in Turkey, and put up its logo and message on some 74 websites, criticizing what it described as greater control over the Internet in Turkey, including blocks on thousands of websites and blogs.

The websites on the list included medical-related sites such as that of a children's hospital, but did not appear to include websites of key government ministries. Websites like those of the Ministry of Justice, Ministry of Health, and Ministry of Interior were unaffected.

The hacks released are part of a "Turkish Takedown Thursday" action planned by the group. Its Antisec program, started in June with the now disbanded hacker group LulzSec, targets governments, law enforcement, and corporations.

Turks took to the streets in May to protest against the new filtering scheme, which plans to introduce four levels of filtering - family, children, domestic, or standard - for Internet users by August 22. While protestors describe the rules as mandatory, the government has said they are optional filters for the protection of families.

Anonymous last month launched DDoS (distributed denial of service) attacks on some Turkish government websites in protest against the proposed filtering rules. Among the sites that were attacked were that of the Internet regulator, Telekomünikasyon İletişim Başkanlığı. This site was not affected on Wednesday.

Turkey responded last month by arresting 32 persons said to be involved in the attacks on the government sites.

Earlier this week, police arrested 15 people in Italy for their alleged involvement in Anonymous attacks, according to reports.

The hacker group is also up against other groups, some of them intent on exposing the identities of Anonymous and LulzSec hackers. A group called TeaMp0isoN released on Wednesday what it said was the personal information of some of the hackers, including Sabu, a prominent LulzSec hacker who is now part of Antisec.

Join the newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Rocket to Success - Your 10 Tips for Smarter ERP System Selection

Tags Anonymoussecurity

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

John Ribeiro

IDG News Service
Show Comments

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Ben Ramsden

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

Brainstorming, innovation, problem solving, and negotiation have all become much more productive and valuable if people can easily collaborate in real time with minimal friction.

Sarah Ieroianni

Brother QL-820NWB Professional Label Printer

The print quality also does not disappoint, it’s clear, bold, doesn’t smudge and the text is perfectly sized.

Ratchada Dunn

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The Huddle Board’s built in program; Sharp Touch Viewing software allows us to easily manipulate and edit our documents (jpegs and PDFs) all at the same time on the dashboard.

George Khoury

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The biggest perks for me would be that it comes with easy to use and comprehensive programs that make the collaboration process a whole lot more intuitive and organic

David Coyle

Brother PocketJet PJ-773 A4 Portable Thermal Printer

I rate the printer as a 5 out of 5 stars as it has been able to fit seamlessly into my busy and mobile lifestyle.

Kurt Hegetschweiler

Brother PocketJet PJ-773 A4 Portable Thermal Printer

It’s perfect for mobile workers. Just take it out — it’s small enough to sit anywhere — turn it on, load a sheet of paper, and start printing.

Featured Content

Product Launch Showcase

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?