Microsoft Azure hosts Hadoop, other open-source apps

Microsoft has also added support for the Node.js library and various other open-source tools

Making good on an announcement made earlier this year, Microsoft has installed a version of Apache Hadoop on its Azure cloud service. The company now offers a limited preview version of the open-source data analysis platform, often used for big data-style analysis.

The availability is part of an Azure upgrade the company announced Monday.

The company has also installed onto Azure the Node.js JavaScript library, and has integrated its PaaS (Platform-as-a-Service) offering with a number of other open-source applications. The Azure upgrade also includes adjusted Azure pricing, an increase in the amount of data that can be stored in SQL Azure, and adds real-time usage and billing information onto the management portal.

In October, Microsoft announced that it would offer Hadoop on Azure, with the help of Hortonworks, a Yahoo spinoff company that offers a Hadoop distribution.

Microsoft's Apache Hadoop Based Distribution for Windows Azure will feature a set of installers, a JavaScript library that will help developers build MapReduce jobs, as well as drivers for analyzing data in the Hadoop Hive database from Microsoft Excel and PowerPivot.

This update offers only a trial version of Hadoop, and Microsoft made no announcement of when it will be available as a full service. Those interested in running the preview version must submit a form. From the submissions, Microsoft will pick an unspecified number of users to test the platform, based on anticipated usage patterns.

In addition to Hadoop, Azure also now incorporates a number of other open-source technologies as well. With the Node.js library, developers can create Web applications that will run from an Azure version of Microsoft Server. Node.js is a collection of integrated JavaScript functions and a JavaScript runtime engine that can be used to build Web applications.

To aid in Node.js use, Microsoft has released a downloadable SDK (software development kit), which includes a copy of Node.js, a version of Windows PowerShell and an Azure emulator. Developers can build and test their applications on their own machines and then upload them to Azure for deployment.

The company has also provided some helpful tools and documentation for integrating into Azure other open-source applications as well, including the Eclipse integrated developer environment, the MongoDB database, the Lucene/Solr search engine and the memcached caching technology.

The support of all these technologies will allow developers to "build applications on Windows Azure using the languages and frameworks they already know," wrote Gianugo Rabellino, Microsoft's senior director of open-source communities, in a blog post.

In addition to the new technologies, Microsoft has made a number of adjustments to Azure pricing as well. Customers in North America and Europe will pay US$0.12 for each GB transferred in and out of Azure (it previously cost $0.15). Asia Pacific customers will be charged $0.19 per GB (it previously cost $0.20).

Database prices have been altered as well. Users can now keep a database as large as 150 GB on Azure--the previous limit was 50 GB. Customers with more than 50 GB will not be charged more than the maximum rate of $499.95.

Joab Jackson covers enterprise software and general technology breaking news for The IDG News Service. Follow Joab on Twitter at @Joab_Jackson. Joab's e-mail address is Joab_Jackson@idg.com

Join the newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Rocket to Success - Your 10 Tips for Smarter ERP System Selection

Tags cloud computingMicrosoftinternetdevelopment platformsInfrastructure services

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Joab Jackson

IDG News Service
Show Comments

Cool Tech

SanDisk MicroSDXC™ for Nintendo® Switch™

Learn more >

Breitling Superocean Heritage Chronographe 44

Learn more >

Toys for Boys

Family Friendly

Panasonic 4K UHD Blu-Ray Player and Full HD Recorder with Netflix - UBT1GL-K

Learn more >

Stocking Stuffer

Razer DeathAdder Expert Ergonomic Gaming Mouse

Learn more >

Christmas Gift Guide

Click for more ›

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Edwina Hargreaves

WD My Cloud Home

I would recommend this device for families and small businesses who want one safe place to store all their important digital content and a way to easily share it with friends, family, business partners, or customers.

Walid Mikhael

Brother QL-820NWB Professional Label Printer

It’s easy to set up, it’s compact and quiet when printing and to top if off, the print quality is excellent. This is hands down the best printer I’ve used for printing labels.

Ben Ramsden

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

Brainstorming, innovation, problem solving, and negotiation have all become much more productive and valuable if people can easily collaborate in real time with minimal friction.

Sarah Ieroianni

Brother QL-820NWB Professional Label Printer

The print quality also does not disappoint, it’s clear, bold, doesn’t smudge and the text is perfectly sized.

Ratchada Dunn

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The Huddle Board’s built in program; Sharp Touch Viewing software allows us to easily manipulate and edit our documents (jpegs and PDFs) all at the same time on the dashboard.

George Khoury

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The biggest perks for me would be that it comes with easy to use and comprehensive programs that make the collaboration process a whole lot more intuitive and organic

Featured Content

Product Launch Showcase

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?