Russian man arrested on cyber-attack charges

The defendant allegedly used denial-of-service attacks to target Amazon.com and eBay, the DOJ says

A Russian man has been arrested in Cyprus on charges that he launched denial-of-service attacks on Amazon.com and eBay in 2008, the U.S. Department of Justice announced.

Dmitry Olegovich Zubakha, 25, of Moscow, was arrested Wednesday, the DOJ said.

An indictment against Zubakha in U.S. District Court for the Western District of Washington, unsealed Thursday, alleges that he and another Russian man used denial-of-service attacks against the websites, also including Priceline.com, in June 2008.

During the attacks, traffic at Amazon.com rose to 600 to 1,000 percent of normal traffic levels, causing the website to be unavailable to customers for several hours, according to the indictment.

Zubakha and his co-conspirator allegedly claimed credit for the attacks in hacker forums, the DOJ said in a press release. The co-conspirator called Priceline.com and offered his services as a consultant to stop the denial-of-service attack, the DOJ said.  In October 2009, law enforcement traced the possession of more than 28,000 stolen credit card numbers to Zubakha and his co-conspirator. 

"These cyber bandits do serious harm to our businesses and their customers," U.S. Attorney Jenny Durkan of the Western District of Washington said in a statement. "But the old adage is true: the arm of the law is long. This defendant could not hide in cyberspace."

The indictment charged Zubakha with conspiracy to intentionally cause damage without authorization to a protected computer and two counts of intentionally causing damage to a protected computer resulting in a loss of more than US$5,000. Zubakha is also charged with possession of 15 or more unauthorized access devices and aggravated identity theft for a separate incident involving the possession of stolen credit card numbers in October 2009. 

The DOJ is seeking to extradite Zubakha from Cyprus, where he remains in custody.

The sentence for conspiracy can be up to five years in prison, while intentionally causing damage to a protected computer can lead to 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. The sentence for possession of more than 15 unauthorized access devices can be up to 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. Aggravated identity theft is punishable by an additional two years in prison on top of any sentence for the underlying crimes.

Grant Gross covers technology and telecom policy in the U.S. government for The IDG News Service. Follow Grant on Twitter at GrantGross. Grant's e-mail address is grant_gross@idg.com.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Grant Gross

IDG News Service
Show Comments

Brand Post

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Tom Pope

Dynabook Portégé X30L-G

Ultimately this laptop has achieved everything I would hope for in a laptop for work, while fitting that into a form factor and weight that is remarkable.

Tom Sellers

MSI P65

This smart laptop was enjoyable to use and great to work on – creating content was super simple.

Lolita Wang

MSI GT76

It really doesn’t get more “gaming laptop” than this.

Jack Jeffries

MSI GS75

As the Maserati or BMW of laptops, it would fit perfectly in the hands of a professional needing firepower under the hood, sophistication and class on the surface, and gaming prowess (sports mode if you will) in between.

Taylor Carr

MSI PS63

The MSI PS63 is an amazing laptop and I would definitely consider buying one in the future.

Christopher Low

Brother RJ-4230B

This small mobile printer is exactly what I need for invoicing and other jobs such as sending fellow tradesman details or step-by-step instructions that I can easily print off from my phone or the Web.

Featured Content

Product Launch Showcase

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?