Twitter-Instagram feud heats up as pics disappear

Instagram pulls photos as speculation over Twitter filters hits

The feud between Twitter and Instagram is heating up.

About a week after Instagram disabled an integration tool, leaving pictures difficult to view on Twitter, the company has pulled all of its photos from Twitter.

The microblogging site announced on its status page that Instagram has disabled photo integration with Twitter.

"As a result, photos are no longer appearing in tweets or user photo galleries," reported Twitter. "While tweeting links to Instagram photos is still possible, you can no longer view the photos on Twitter, as was previously the case."

Neither Twitter nor Instagram immediately responded to requests for comment.

Last week, Instagram CEO and co-founder Kevin Systrom told Computerworld in an email that he wants to create the best experience for the photo-sharing apps, but also wants users to spend more time on the Instagram site.

"A handful of months ago, we supported Twitter Cards because we had a minimal Web presence," Systrom wrote. "We've since launched several improvements to our Web site that allow users to directly engage with Instagram content through likes, comments [and] hashtags, and now we believe the best experience is for us to link back to where the content lives.

"We will continue to evaluate how to improve the experience with Twitter and Instagram photos," he added. "As has been the case, Instagram users will continue to be able to share to Twitter as they originally did before the Twitter Cards implementation."

Relations between Twitter and Instagram are complicated because even though the two businesses have benefitted from each other, each wants to keep users on its own site. Making things even more dicey between the two, Facebook in April bought the popular photo-sharing app company for $1 billion.

Then, earlier this fall, Instagram saw a big upswing among mobile users that pushed the app past Twitter in the mobile arena.

Instagram, which is just two years old, went from 886,000 daily mobile users in March to 7.3 million in August, a nearly nine-fold increase, according to comScore, an online tracking and analytics company. That growth put Instagram ahead of Twitter, which had 6.86 million daily active mobile users in August, an increase of 24% during the same six-month period.

Now there may be another wedge between the two.

According to a report from All Things D, Twitter is working on a bundle of its own photo filters that can be used inside the Twitter app. Citing unnamed sources, the report indicates that the filters could be ready for an app update in time for the holiday season.

"This is a manifestation of the inherent conflict in social media, or on the Web in general," Ezra Gottheil, an analyst with Technology Business Research, said in an interview. "You want to get traffic from other sites, but you want people to have a reason to stay with you. They have to work together, but they also have to give users a reason to go to their own sites. Those are often conflicting goals."

Instagram wants users to see its images on Twitter and then visit Instagram -- and ultimately Facebook. Twitter, however, wants people to see the images on Twitter and stay on Twitter.

Sharon Gaudin covers the Internet and Web 2.0, emerging technologies, and desktop and laptop chips for Computerworld. Follow Sharon on Twitter at @sgaudin, on Google+ or subscribe to Sharon's RSS feed. Her email address is sgaudin@computerworld.com.

See more by Sharon Gaudin on Computerworld.com.

Read more about social media in Computerworld's Social Media Topic Center.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags social mediainternettwitterweb appsInternet-based applications and servicesInstagram

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.
Sharon Gaudin

Sharon Gaudin

Computerworld (US)
Show Comments

Cool Tech

Bang and Olufsen Beosound Stage - Dolby Atmos Soundbar

Learn more >

Toys for Boys

Sony WF-1000XM3 Wireless Noise Cancelling Headphones

Learn more >

ASUS ROG, ACRONYM partner for Special Edition Zephyrus G14

Learn more >

Nakamichi Delta 100 3-Way Hi Fi Speaker System

Learn more >

Family Friendly

Mario Kart Live: Home Circuit for Nintendo Switch

Learn more >

Philips Sonicare Diamond Clean 9000 Toothbrush

Learn more >

Stocking Stuffer

SunnyBunny Snowflakes 20 LED Solar Powered Fairy String

Learn more >

Teac 7 inch Swivel Screen Portable DVD Player

Learn more >

Christmas Gift Guide

Click for more ›

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Tom Pope

Dynabook Portégé X30L-G

Ultimately this laptop has achieved everything I would hope for in a laptop for work, while fitting that into a form factor and weight that is remarkable.

Tom Sellers

MSI P65

This smart laptop was enjoyable to use and great to work on – creating content was super simple.

Lolita Wang

MSI GT76

It really doesn’t get more “gaming laptop” than this.

Jack Jeffries

MSI GS75

As the Maserati or BMW of laptops, it would fit perfectly in the hands of a professional needing firepower under the hood, sophistication and class on the surface, and gaming prowess (sports mode if you will) in between.

Taylor Carr

MSI PS63

The MSI PS63 is an amazing laptop and I would definitely consider buying one in the future.

Christopher Low

Brother RJ-4230B

This small mobile printer is exactly what I need for invoicing and other jobs such as sending fellow tradesman details or step-by-step instructions that I can easily print off from my phone or the Web.

Featured Content

Product Launch Showcase

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?