Digg's replacement for Google Reader due in June; might cost money

With the clock ticking down to the demise of Google Reader, Digg promises a beta version of its Reader alternative will launch just in time.

With the clock ticking down to the July 1 demise of Google Reader, Digg has promised that a beta version of its Reader alternative will launch just in time.

The beta will arrive sometime in June, Digg said in a blog post. However, Reader refugees hoping for a free ride are in for some bad news: Digg seems likely to charge for the product in some way.

Citing a survey of 8,600 people who have expressed interest in the Digg's Reader replacement, Digg says 40 percent would be willing to pay. The company doesn't seem keen on launching a free product, noting that they "tend to disappear, leaving users in a lurch."

"We need to build a product that people can rely on and trust will always be there for them," Digg's blog post said. "We're not sure how pricing might work, but we do know that we'd like our users to be our customers, not our product."

Possible features?

Digg also posted some other findings from its survey, hinting at potential features for its reader.

For instance, 75 percent of respondents said they share links via email, followed by roughly 55 percent for Facebook and Twitter. "It almost goes without saying that our reader will include seamless sharing to all these services," Digg wrote. The company said it plans to support "read-it-later" services, such as Pocket, Instapaper, and Evernote.

As for social features, Digg said they weren't a top priority for respondents. Digg won't have social features in place for launch, but ultimately wants to include them. (This may be a touchy subject for Google Reader veterans, who seethed when Google replaced the service's built-in social features with Google+ in 2011.)

From the sound of it, Digg's RSS concoction won't be a straightforward Reader replacement. But with possible support for social sharing and "read-it-later" services, it could be a close competitor to Feedly, which TechHive's Evan Dashevsky adored more than other alternatives.

What could Digg add that would make its own reader worth paying for? Perhaps we'll find out in a month or so.

Join the newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Rocket to Success - Your 10 Tips for Smarter ERP System Selection

Tags smbEvernotesmall businessGoogletwitterinternetdiggFacebook

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Jared Newman

TechHive (US)
Show Comments

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Ben Ramsden

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

Brainstorming, innovation, problem solving, and negotiation have all become much more productive and valuable if people can easily collaborate in real time with minimal friction.

Sarah Ieroianni

Brother QL-820NWB Professional Label Printer

The print quality also does not disappoint, it’s clear, bold, doesn’t smudge and the text is perfectly sized.

Ratchada Dunn

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The Huddle Board’s built in program; Sharp Touch Viewing software allows us to easily manipulate and edit our documents (jpegs and PDFs) all at the same time on the dashboard.

George Khoury

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The biggest perks for me would be that it comes with easy to use and comprehensive programs that make the collaboration process a whole lot more intuitive and organic

David Coyle

Brother PocketJet PJ-773 A4 Portable Thermal Printer

I rate the printer as a 5 out of 5 stars as it has been able to fit seamlessly into my busy and mobile lifestyle.

Kurt Hegetschweiler

Brother PocketJet PJ-773 A4 Portable Thermal Printer

It’s perfect for mobile workers. Just take it out — it’s small enough to sit anywhere — turn it on, load a sheet of paper, and start printing.

Featured Content

Product Launch Showcase

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?