IBM and Microsoft pledge to make their Clouds compatible

IBM will support Microsoft technologies, and vice versa, in each other's respective Cloud

Although fierce rivals in the market for Cloud computing services, IBM and Microsoft have pledged to make their technologies interoperable in the Cloud for the sake of their users.

The companies have jointly announced that many Microsoft enterprise products would run on IBM's infrastructure and platform services, and that many key IBM middleware products would be available for use on Microsoft Azure.

"The cloud is an interesting change in the technology landscape. In a lot of ways it opens everybody up to be your partner as well as your competitor, more so than on-premise software did in the past," said Michael Curry, IBM vice president of WebSphere product management. "The key element here is about offering choice for our customers -- to have the flexibility to deploy software in lots of different places."

IBM middleware such as WebSphere application server, the Websphere MQ messaging bus and the DB2 database will be made available on Microsoft's Azure cloud service, while Microsoft's Windows Server and SQL Server will be offered as part of the IBM Cloud set of infrastructure services, and the Microsoft .NET runtime will be offered on IBM's Bluemix platform service.

Customers will also be able to run in the IBM Cloud their virtual machines based in the Windows Server Hyper-V hypervisor. IBM's Pure Application Service, IBM's approach for packaging a set of applications to run in the cloud, will be available on Azure.

Both companies will also honor preexisting licenses for software use from the other company. Microsoft will also offer the ability to purchase IBM middleware software licenses on a pay-per-use basis on Azure.

Some of the fruits from this work will appear immediately. IBM SoftLayer already offers a wide range of Microsoft software, such as Windows Server and Hyper-V. Other projects, such as making a copy of .NET to run on Bluemix might take some time due to the engineering work that would be needed, Curry said.

"We want to attract .NET developers to understand the power of Bluemix to build a new class of cloud applications," Curry said.

Curry expected that a preview of the Bluemix-based .NET would be available within the next several months.

The two companies, which both appear to be catching up with Amazon's lead in offering cloud services, seem to be running pretty close in acquiring new customers.

IBM generated $US4.4 billion in Cloud-related revenue in 2013, and this year sales have increased by an additional 50 per cent, according to the company. In its latest fiscal quarter, ending in June, Microsoft reported an 147 per cent increase in Cloud revenue, which would bring its current annual run rate to about $US4.4 billion as well, according to the company.

Joab Jackson covers enterprise software and general technology breaking news for The IDG News Service. Follow Joab on Twitter at @Joab_Jackson. Joab's e-mail address is Joab_Jackson@idg.com

Join the newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Rocket to Success - Your 10 Tips for Smarter ERP System Selection

Tags cloud computingMicrosoftinternetIBMInfrastructure services

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Joab Jackson

IDG News Service
Show Comments

Cool Tech

Breitling Superocean Heritage Chronographe 44

Learn more >

SanDisk MicroSDXC™ for Nintendo® Switch™

Learn more >

Toys for Boys

Family Friendly

Panasonic 4K UHD Blu-Ray Player and Full HD Recorder with Netflix - UBT1GL-K

Learn more >

Stocking Stuffer

Razer DeathAdder Expert Ergonomic Gaming Mouse

Learn more >

Christmas Gift Guide

Click for more ›

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Edwina Hargreaves

WD My Cloud Home

I would recommend this device for families and small businesses who want one safe place to store all their important digital content and a way to easily share it with friends, family, business partners, or customers.

Walid Mikhael

Brother QL-820NWB Professional Label Printer

It’s easy to set up, it’s compact and quiet when printing and to top if off, the print quality is excellent. This is hands down the best printer I’ve used for printing labels.

Ben Ramsden

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

Brainstorming, innovation, problem solving, and negotiation have all become much more productive and valuable if people can easily collaborate in real time with minimal friction.

Sarah Ieroianni

Brother QL-820NWB Professional Label Printer

The print quality also does not disappoint, it’s clear, bold, doesn’t smudge and the text is perfectly sized.

Ratchada Dunn

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The Huddle Board’s built in program; Sharp Touch Viewing software allows us to easily manipulate and edit our documents (jpegs and PDFs) all at the same time on the dashboard.

George Khoury

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The biggest perks for me would be that it comes with easy to use and comprehensive programs that make the collaboration process a whole lot more intuitive and organic

Featured Content

Product Launch Showcase

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?