EU Parliament votes for tougher rules on use of conflict minerals

If implemented, the rules will potentially affect 880,000 companies, including tech firms

Vote in the European Parliament

Vote in the European Parliament

The European Parliament wants to apply strict disclosure requirements on companies whose products contain so-called conflict materials, often used in laptops, tablets and smartphones and other consumer electronics.

The EU legislative body approved a draft regulation on Wednesday that would oblige companies, including tech firms, to provide information on the use of material sourced from conflict zones, areas where the mining and sales of minerals is often controlled by warlords. The rules would also make companies disclose the steps they are taking to avoid use of such materials.

If implemented, the rules would potentially affect 880,000 EU companies that use tin, tungsten, tantalum and gold in manufacturing consumer products, the Parliament said in a news release.

In addition, the Parliament voted in favor of a mandatory certification system for EU importers of minerals used for manufacturing consumer goods.

The system needs to ensure that importers do not fuel conflict and human rights abuses in areas of the Democratic Republic of Congo and other parts of Africa, the Parliament said.

The rules approved by the Parliament are more strict than those proposed by the European Commission, which favors a less stringent, voluntary self-certification system.

Such a voluntary system, though, was slammed for being "weak" by more than 150 rights groups that called on the Parliament earlier this week to propose rules that have a meaningful impact.

The Parliament's proposed rules, however, won't become law anytime soon. Beyond Wednesday's vote lies a long road of negotiations. Next, the Parliament will enter into informal talks with ministers of European countries gathered in the Council of the EU, the EU's other law-making body, to seek agreement on the final version of the law.

Judith Sargentini, a Green member of Parliament from the Netherlands, said in a press release that strict rules are essential to ensure Europe plays a proactive role in stopping the use of conflict minerals. If implemented, they would ensure that consumer goods like tablets and mobile phones are covered, she said.

Exactly how the system proposed by the Parliament would work is unclear, but the plan is to model it on the due diligence guidance for responsibly sourcing minerals from conflict areas issued by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). It is designed to help companies respect human rights and avoid contributing to conflict.

The same OECD guidance was used as the basis for regulation in the U.S., where the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) in 2012 implemented a rule requiring publicly traded companies to disclose whether they used minerals that originated in the Democratic Republic of Congo or adjoining countries.

Loek is Amsterdam Correspondent and covers online privacy, intellectual property, online payment issues as well as EU technology policy and regulation for the IDG News Service. Follow him on Twitter at @loekessers or email tips and comments to loek_essers@idg.com

Join the newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Rocket to Success - Your 10 Tips for Smarter ERP System Selection

Tags governmentregulationEuropean Parliament

Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Loek Essers

IDG News Service
Show Comments

Cool Tech

SanDisk MicroSDXC™ for Nintendo® Switch™

Learn more >

Breitling Superocean Heritage Chronographe 44

Learn more >

Toys for Boys

Family Friendly

Panasonic 4K UHD Blu-Ray Player and Full HD Recorder with Netflix - UBT1GL-K

Learn more >

Stocking Stuffer

Razer DeathAdder Expert Ergonomic Gaming Mouse

Learn more >

Christmas Gift Guide

Click for more ›

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Edwina Hargreaves

WD My Cloud Home

I would recommend this device for families and small businesses who want one safe place to store all their important digital content and a way to easily share it with friends, family, business partners, or customers.

Walid Mikhael

Brother QL-820NWB Professional Label Printer

It’s easy to set up, it’s compact and quiet when printing and to top if off, the print quality is excellent. This is hands down the best printer I’ve used for printing labels.

Ben Ramsden

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

Brainstorming, innovation, problem solving, and negotiation have all become much more productive and valuable if people can easily collaborate in real time with minimal friction.

Sarah Ieroianni

Brother QL-820NWB Professional Label Printer

The print quality also does not disappoint, it’s clear, bold, doesn’t smudge and the text is perfectly sized.

Ratchada Dunn

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The Huddle Board’s built in program; Sharp Touch Viewing software allows us to easily manipulate and edit our documents (jpegs and PDFs) all at the same time on the dashboard.

George Khoury

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The biggest perks for me would be that it comes with easy to use and comprehensive programs that make the collaboration process a whole lot more intuitive and organic

Featured Content

Product Launch Showcase

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?