Call of Duty: WWII vs. Medal of Honor: Allied Assault: Storming Normandy then and now

Graphics sure have come a long way.

Credit: Adam Patrick Murray/IDG

In our review I referred to Call of Duty: WWII as a “Greatest Hits Collection” of past World War II video games. And of course, the highlight is D-Day—the most notorious World War II video game level ever since 2002’s Medal of Honor: Allied Assault. So we decided to compare the two Normandy recreations. We grabbed a copy of Allied Assault from GOG.com and enlisted.

Or...well, actually we grabbed a copy from GOG.com, then spent 30-odd minutes trying to get a config file to output native 1080p resolution correctly. But hey, at least it ran on Windows 10.

As it turns out I’d also misremembered—the Omaha Beach level in Allied Assault was actually the third mission, not the opener. (It was the opener in the console equivalent of Allied Assault, the PS2 game Medal of Honor: Frontlines.) It also turns out that Allied Assault is pretty damn hard to go back to, 15 years later.

But we tried. We died, and died often, but we tried to show off a bit of what Omaha Beach looked like in 2002 versus 2017. Our worst enemy: Hedgehogs that don’t look like they should protect you from incoming German machine gun fire, but surprisingly do. Also, not knowing where the hell the Bangalores are located.

To save time we also stole someone’s Omaha Beach save from the internet. There was no indication which difficulty the save was on, which may also be responsible for us being shredded to bits by machine gun fire. Either that or Allied Assault is even more unforgiving than I remember.

Anyway, highlights include: A D-Day landing that is six or seven boats full of polygonal triangle-soldiers, fake Tom Hanks, the aforementioned Bangalore bungle, and then a look at what Omaha Beach looks like 15 years later courtesy of Call of Duty: WWII ($60 on Amazon). Graphics sure have come a long way.

Join the newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Rocket to Success - Your 10 Tips for Smarter ERP System Selection
Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Hayden Dingman

PC World (US online)
Show Comments

Cool Tech

SanDisk MicroSDXC™ for Nintendo® Switch™

Learn more >

Breitling Superocean Heritage Chronographe 44

Learn more >

Toys for Boys

Family Friendly

Panasonic 4K UHD Blu-Ray Player and Full HD Recorder with Netflix - UBT1GL-K

Learn more >

Stocking Stuffer

Razer DeathAdder Expert Ergonomic Gaming Mouse

Learn more >

Christmas Gift Guide

Click for more ›

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Walid Mikhael

Brother QL-820NWB Professional Label Printer

It’s easy to set up, it’s compact and quiet when printing and to top if off, the print quality is excellent. This is hands down the best printer I’ve used for printing labels.

Ben Ramsden

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

Brainstorming, innovation, problem solving, and negotiation have all become much more productive and valuable if people can easily collaborate in real time with minimal friction.

Sarah Ieroianni

Brother QL-820NWB Professional Label Printer

The print quality also does not disappoint, it’s clear, bold, doesn’t smudge and the text is perfectly sized.

Ratchada Dunn

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The Huddle Board’s built in program; Sharp Touch Viewing software allows us to easily manipulate and edit our documents (jpegs and PDFs) all at the same time on the dashboard.

George Khoury

Sharp PN-40TC1 Huddle Board

The biggest perks for me would be that it comes with easy to use and comprehensive programs that make the collaboration process a whole lot more intuitive and organic

David Coyle

Brother PocketJet PJ-773 A4 Portable Thermal Printer

I rate the printer as a 5 out of 5 stars as it has been able to fit seamlessly into my busy and mobile lifestyle.

Featured Content

Product Launch Showcase

Latest Jobs

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?