Interview: Sun's Green says ruling will boost Java

Sun Microsystems's top Java executive contends that the federal court's impending "must carry" decision will aid corporate developers by assuring Java's ubiquitous distribution. In this interview, Richard Green, Sun's vice president and general manager for Java and XML, discussed the ruling's impact.

Q: How has Java been affected by Microsoft's decision not to ship the latest version with its desktop operating system?

Microsoft owns the principal distribution channels to the desktop. When they focus their energies on distributing an out-of-date version, they dilute the efforts of developers to create new applications by convincing them that this is not something that they should be using. The effect has been to freeze or delay development of really interesting state-of-the-art network applications based on Java for the desktop.

Q: What would a "must carry" order accomplish for Java?

The ruling ensures that the volume for this development platform will be greater than any other platform in the world, because it will be the sum of Unix, plus Linux, plus handhelds, plus servers. This will be the largest-volume development platform shipping worldwide.

Q: This ruling is limited to desktops. Will it affect other systems?

If you have a consistent set of APIs and programming models across all your systems, as a developer you can be more productive. So although these injunctions do not bear directly on platforms other than the desktops, for developers and end users it will offer ease of development and consistency.

Q: How does this help you compete against .Net?

The killer feature to date that .Net has over Java is not technology; it's not marketing; it's not tools. It's distribution. It's the ability of developers to count on it being present when they deploy their applications. That is the .Net advantage, and this injunction cancels that out.

Q: If Microsoft succeeds in reversing this injunction on appeal, will Java be crippled?

Java will go on as it has been: successful in the enterprise, on servers, on handhelds. But not as successful as we would like, by any means, as a desktop development platform.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Keep up with the latest tech news, reviews and previews by subscribing to the Good Gear Guide newsletter.

Patrick Thibodeau

Computerworld
Show Comments

Brand Post

Most Popular Reviews

Latest Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Tom Pope

Dynabook Portégé X30L-G

Ultimately this laptop has achieved everything I would hope for in a laptop for work, while fitting that into a form factor and weight that is remarkable.

Tom Sellers

MSI P65

This smart laptop was enjoyable to use and great to work on – creating content was super simple.

Lolita Wang

MSI GT76

It really doesn’t get more “gaming laptop” than this.

Jack Jeffries

MSI GS75

As the Maserati or BMW of laptops, it would fit perfectly in the hands of a professional needing firepower under the hood, sophistication and class on the surface, and gaming prowess (sports mode if you will) in between.

Taylor Carr

MSI PS63

The MSI PS63 is an amazing laptop and I would definitely consider buying one in the future.

Christopher Low

Brother RJ-4230B

This small mobile printer is exactly what I need for invoicing and other jobs such as sending fellow tradesman details or step-by-step instructions that I can easily print off from my phone or the Web.

Featured Content

Product Launch Showcase

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?