Kobo Wireless eReader

The Kobo Wireless eReader offers better performance, but screen refresh and speed remain issues

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  • Expert Rating

    3.25 / 5

Pros

  • Lightweight, easy to hold, improved display contrast and sharpness

Cons

  • Screen refresh still slow

Bottom Line

The Kobo eReader's main appeal is to those who prefer ePub files; for now, this is the least expensive Wi-Fi-connected ePub-compatible model, and it handles the format well.

Would you buy this?

As on the previous model, the menu interface on the new Wireless eReader is visually pleasing; so too is the Kobo desktop app (once I got it to install), which remains somewhat rough beneath its glossy surface. The interface is far better than most, and it provides a better shopping arrangement than you get from lesser-known competitors such as Aluratek, Cool-er, and Cybook; for one thing, the bookstore integration via Wi-Fi means that you can buy a book while, say, sitting in an airport and waiting for your flight.

The store is a mixed bag, though. I appreciate the fact that it's available, and that I can buy something new while I'm on the go. But it's extremely sluggish, and the screen refreshes slowly. It offers sections for categories, recommended titles, free titles, and search. Searching is difficult, however, because you have to tap out words letter by letter on the on-screen keyboard. The idea of perusing 94 pages of New York Times Fiction Bestsellers on this device is also offputting, to put it mildly. If you want to hop into the store for a quick acquisition, and you know what you want, that's one thing. But don't expect to explore the reading world from the Kobo Wireless.

As with the first Kobo model, though, this e-reader's 1GB of on-board memory is not fully accessible to users. Instead, the memory includes a hidden partition that's accessible only via the app. And for now, you can't touch the 100 or so preloaded public-domain classics, because they live on that partition. So if you really don't want Anna Karenina popping up in your library every day, you don't have the option to delete it. Kobo claimed with its first device that this arrangement may change, but given that the second-generation model still has this problem, I wouldn't count on it.

Beyond the new display--which is still 800-by-600-pixel resolution but is now 16-grayscale, putting it in line with the competition--the specs remain largely familiar. The unit can read DRM ePub, Adobe Digital Editions, and PDFs (though the PDF handling remains weak, relying on pan-and-zoom to get around). You can put content on the reader via the SD Card, through USB transfer (a mini-USB port is on the bottom of the device), by shopping on the Website, or by shopping on the device itself. The inclusion of Wi-Fi puts a damper on the battery life, though: This model is rated for only 10 days of battery life, versus two weeks for the original Kobo and the Sony Reader, and one month for the Amazon Kindle.

Unlike with the original Kobo, whose buttons were stiff, the buttons here are highly responsive. With the improved buttons, the device's overall design feels elevated somehow. The buttons (four along the left, plus a five-way navigation pad beneath the screen at right) are all in the same locations as they were on the original Kobo, and they're easy to access. The unit's light weight--about 7.8 ounces, lighter than the 8.7-ounce Amazon Kindle and the 7.9-ounce Sony Reader Touch Edition--contributes to making the Kobo a pleasure to hold while reading.

Where this e-reader truly continues to excel, though, is in its interface. The text is easy to read, logically and attractively presented, and genuinely friendly (more so than that of even more mature devices, such as the Amazon Kindle 2), with clear directions. For example, press the center nav button while reading, and you'll invoke the fly-out menu options; on-screen, you get a note as to which button to press to close the menu.

The Kobo Wireless eReader's main appeal is to those people who would prefer to stick with an e-reader ecosystem that can handle ePub files; at this writing, the Kobo reader is the least expensive Wi-Fi-connected model to do so, and it does the job well. But for the same price, Amazon's Kindle provides better performance and a built-in keyboard for easier searching.

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