Wacom Cintiq 21UX

Wacom  Cintiq 21UX
  • Expert Rating

    3.50 / 5

Pros

  • Touch screen, rugged stand

Cons

  • Can't achieve full 90 degrees or 0 degrees to the ground, expensive

Bottom Line

This pricey touch screen monitor allows working with images in new ways, but its size and limited positioning options can make it tough to use.

Would you buy this?

  • Price

    $ 4,299.00 (AUD)

For years I've dreamed of making changes to images in Adobe Photoshop directly on the screen, the way I work on paper. Wacom's 21" Cintiq 21UX touch screen monitor promised to make my dream a reality. But as often happens, things didn't turn out as smoothly in the real world as they did in my imaginings.

This specialty monitor isn't for everyone; Wacom has aimed the Cintiq squarely at graphics professionals, or hobbyists with fat wallets. You can use it with a wide range of applications--everything from graphics and Web design to architecture and video creation.

Testing my shipping unit with Adobe Photoshop was a real treat. I found myself working almost exclusively with the program's brush palette, switching out different tips and making little digital paintings and drawings. The monitor had me using Photoshop in a totally different way, and it allowed me to spend more time following my creative fancy.

The monitor sits on a rugged, swivelled stand that makes it easy to tilt the 8.5 kilogram display from roughly 20 degrees short of vertical (Wacom claims 10 degrees) down to nearly flat.

This flexibility accommodates different styles of drawing and also eases the ergonomic impact of holding your arm up for long periods of time. My arm soon tired after drawing with the monitor upright; however, after I switched to a more horizontal position, my fatigue eased. In fact I found the horizontal position best for drawing. Swivelling back to the upright position (which I found best for reading) was a breeze.

Unfortunately, the monitor doesn't reach a full 90 degrees vertical when in its stand, so I found the glare from overhead lights was always a problem. It also doesn't lay completely flat, so I was always dealing with some tilt.

Another limitation: you can't rotate the screen from a landscape to a portrait orientation to work on Web pages or on long, thin images.

You can connect the monitor to your computer using either the VGA or DVI connector. The analog signal showed some softness, especially when viewing text, but the digital one produced a sharp image with good colour and contrast. When you look closely at the screen, you notice the extremely fine horizontal lines that sense the stylus tip on the screen. At a normal viewing distance, however, these lines aren't apparent.

Thin touch pads on the left and right sides of the monitor frame make it easy to scroll and reposition the cursor. Four programmable buttons--two on each side of the display--access any menu, shortcut or key combination (if the buttons get in the way of your drawing, you can disable them). The control panel for the Cintiq even allows you to configure the buttons for specific applications--so you might have one set of controls for Photoshop and a different set for Corel Painter, for example.

The Cintiq's brightness, contrast and other controls reside in an awkward position on the top of the monitor, which makes it difficult to adjust while you're sitting down. Perhaps the engineers at Wacom considered this when they put Braille-like dots on the controls so that you could feel your way around them.

The reality of working on a display the way I do on paper came up a touch short of my hopes and expectations. Still, at a lower price and with a little more flexibility in positioning, the Cintiq could well become the monitor of my dreams.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Cool Tech

Bang and Olufsen Beosound Stage - Dolby Atmos Soundbar

Learn more >

Toys for Boys

ASUS ROG, ACRONYM partner for Special Edition Zephyrus G14

Learn more >

Sony WF-1000XM3 Wireless Noise Cancelling Headphones

Learn more >

Nakamichi Delta 100 3-Way Hi Fi Speaker System

Learn more >

Family Friendly

Mario Kart Live: Home Circuit for Nintendo Switch

Learn more >

Philips Sonicare Diamond Clean 9000 Toothbrush

Learn more >

Stocking Stuffer

SunnyBunny Snowflakes 20 LED Solar Powered Fairy String

Learn more >

Teac 7 inch Swivel Screen Portable DVD Player

Learn more >

Christmas Gift Guide

Click for more ›

Brand Post

Most Popular Reviews

Latest News Articles

Resources

PCW Evaluation Team

Tom Pope

Dynabook Portégé X30L-G

Ultimately this laptop has achieved everything I would hope for in a laptop for work, while fitting that into a form factor and weight that is remarkable.

Tom Sellers

MSI P65

This smart laptop was enjoyable to use and great to work on – creating content was super simple.

Lolita Wang

MSI GT76

It really doesn’t get more “gaming laptop” than this.

Jack Jeffries

MSI GS75

As the Maserati or BMW of laptops, it would fit perfectly in the hands of a professional needing firepower under the hood, sophistication and class on the surface, and gaming prowess (sports mode if you will) in between.

Taylor Carr

MSI PS63

The MSI PS63 is an amazing laptop and I would definitely consider buying one in the future.

Christopher Low

Brother RJ-4230B

This small mobile printer is exactly what I need for invoicing and other jobs such as sending fellow tradesman details or step-by-step instructions that I can easily print off from my phone or the Web.

Featured Content

Product Launch Showcase

Don’t have an account? Sign up here

Don't have an account? Sign up now

Forgot password?